Overhyped No More: What Developers Are Saying about HTML5

Jenny

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Predictions and prognostications regarding the future of HTML5 abound. Everyone’s got an opinion.

But what about the people actually doing the developing? What do developers think about HTML5? Kendo UI decided to ask—and the results are interesting.

Last fall, Kendo UI surveyed more than 4,000 software developers about their usage, attitudes and expectations around HTML5. The results demonstrate widespread adoption of HTML5: The majority of developers (82%) reported that HTML5 was already important to their job—or would be within 12 months.

Respondents noted why HTML5 development is more appealing than other options for writing software:

  • The familiarity of language (72%)
  • Reach/ Cross-platform support (62%)
  • Performance (34%)
  • Others reasons: Availability of tools/libraries, productivity, it’s based on open standards, the cost of development, and community.

 You can see a summary of these survey results here. 

This Venture Beat article shares some results from an even more recent study, again by Kendo UI, of 5,000 developers:

  • Fifty percent of respondents have developed in HTML5, and 90 percent plan to in 2013.
  • Only 15 percent of developers would go native-only when building an app for multiple platforms.
  • Only a quarter of developers now believe that HTML5 is overhyped; almost half strongly believe it’s not.

And developers are using HTML5 for all sorts of apps. Respondents cited productivity (54%), utility (38%), consumer (39%), LOB (22%), social networking (18%), entertainment (17%), lifestyle (12%), travel (9%), games (8%) and other (13%). (See these statistics and more, along with a handy infographic, in this Venture Beat article.)

HTML5 has widespread adoption around the globe, according to this latest study. The largest percentage of developers already using HTML5 is found in North America (70%). But roughly 60 percent of South American, European and Chinese developers are using it, and about half of developers in Africa are.

Amazing what you can learn when you ask the folks who are doing the work.

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