Monthly Archives: May 2010

Interviewed at This Week In Asia

Bernard Leong and Daniel Cerventus of This Week in Asia interviewed me last week in advance of the Echelon 2010 conference in Singapore on June 1-2.  I will be speaking at Echelon about browser customizations and how they can help startups retain users and grow usage of your website/ webservice.

If you’re going to Echelon, I look forward to seeing you.

This Week in Asia Episode 39: Gen Kanai from Mozilla

I made one error in the interview that I need to clarify.

I said that the Firefox 4 alphas are not yet available. That is incorrect. They are available today as Mozilla Developer Preview (Gecko 1.9.3 alpha).

I got confused between the Firefox for Android builds, which were pre-alpha at the time of the interview but is now available as a nightly build for testing.

quick update on Korea

Kim Tong-hyung, staff reporter for the Korea Times, is the only reporter providing English-language coverage of the news on the Microsoft monopoly in S. Korea.

I wanted to share two recent articles from Kim Tong-hyung, one covering the event that Mozilla’s Lucas Adamski attended at the end of April and another covering the “anti-virus” industry in Korea, which is one of the incumbent industries that would be significantly negatively affected if the Korean government moved away from the current PKI-based encryption architecture.

Experts Say Specific Tech Mandates Make [Korean] Internet Banking Vulnerable

“There is danger in relying on technology too much, and specific technology in that,” Schneier said, stressing that the government should be commanding “results,” rather than technologies, from banks and credit-card companies in their efforts to provide better user protection.

“Once a law mandates specific technologies such as protocol, applications or software, innovation stops. Companies know they will be okay as long as they do everything that the law says, and they will not figure out ways to make things more secure.

and

Lucas Adamski, who heads the software security team at Mozilla, which backs the Firefox Web browser, said online banking and e-commerce providers should consider redesigning their Web pages to support HTTPS, or HTTP Secure.

“Supporting HTTPS comes with many benefits. The server is authenticated to ensure the user is talking to the server they think are talking to, before any content is sent or received,” Adamski said.

“The browser will not normally send or receive any content from a Web site with an invalid or expired certificate or if the certificate does not match the server name. This means that there is no opportunity for a man-in-the-middle (MITM) injection attack to happen in the first place.”

Is AhnLab to blame for online banking mess?

Kim Kee-chang, a Korea University law professor who had led a series of unsuccessful lawsuits against the government over the overwhelming Active-X use, is absolutely merciless when describing the role of AhnLab and other anti-virus firms in the whole mess.

“Anti-virus firms are the only ones who are benefiting from the current Internet banking structure, which itself happens to be the biggest fraud of all. This system is all about creating an illusion of security that essentially does nothing other than allowing these software makers to make easy money off aging technology,” Kim said in a recent interview with The Korea Times.

“It’s depressing to see these so-called Internet technology experts sinking so low, sacrificing their morality to the last ounce in pursuit of profit. They have government officials in their pockets, as nobody ever accuses bureaucrats of having a bright understanding of technology,” he said, emphasizing that it was the anti-virus firms that chose plug-ins as the method to provide the required security programs to banks and computer users.