Category Archives: open web

Shanghai Community meeting December 8

Please join me at the upcoming Mozilla community meeting in Shanghai on the afternoon/evening of Sunday, December 8th. My presentation will be in English on the topic of community building strategies but I think the bulk of the meeting will be in Chinese.

A draft agenda is as follows (this may change):

3:00 - 3:10 pm Short introduction about Mozilla/Firefox l10n related work 
3:10 - 3:30 pm the translation guide lines introduction
3:30 - 3:45 pm break
3:45 - 4:45 pm Firefox OS and Firefox Marketplace
4:45 - 5:00 pm break and free discussion
5:00 - 6:00 pm AMO, MDN, SUMO translation, l10n sprint
6:05 - 6:45 pm Gen's speech & QA
6:45 - 7:15 pm Pizza dinner
7:15 - 8:00 pm Movie "Code Rush"

- Event venue
上海市静安区昌平路990号8号楼 联合创业办公社 (延平智阁)
Google Maps link

Please feel free to either show up at the event itself or if you’d like, please leave a comment and we’ll know to look for you. Hope you can join us!

Mozilla South Asia Inter-Community Meet-up 2013

I look forward to the first Mozilla South Asia Inter-Community Meet-up 2013 this weekend in Kathmandu.

The first Mozilla South Asia Inter-Community meet-up will take place in Kathmandu, Nepal, on 23-24 February 2013, with the coordination from Mozilla Nepal Regional community. It will bring together community leaders from the South Asia, including paid staff from across the SAARC countries, to meet for 3 days of presentations, breakout sessions and discussions to plan the implementation of the Mozilla South Asia community road map for 2013 and ensure that the regional community is fully aligned with greater engagement efforts across the Mozilla organization.

The aim of the workshop is to enable Mozilla communities in the South Asia region to share and learn from each other’s experience working on the Mozilla Project, improve collaboration in the future, and work on specific tasks. The event will be focused on operations & roadmap planning for each existing local communities of the South Asia.

John Lilly’s thoughts on Opera moving to WebKit

John Lilly’s thoughts on Opera moving to WebKit:

But what I have learned being around the Mozilla folks is that technologies always, always, always have arcs. Seems obvious. But decisions that seem incredibly clear in the near term — say a period of 3 or 4 years — don’t always seem so clear several years later.

What we know for sure is this: monocultures always make more & faster progress in the near term when they’re stewarded by strong, vibrant leaders. But over time you get stuck. Companies change, sensibilities change. And then you’ve got all the technology, and all talent, and all of the best thinkers, all trapped on one technology stack.

What we do know is that in technology, we’ve never been served well by monocultures — we know this for sure. I worry that in our desire for clearer definition, easier standards, faster progress, we’re forgetting that we know this. Same as it ever was, I suppose.

 

Tragedy of the WebKit Commons

Tragedy of the WebKit Commons

jQuery Core has more lines of fixes and patches for WebKit than any other browser. In general these are not recent regressions, but long-standing problems that have yet to be addressed.

It’s starting to feel like oldIE all over again, but with a different set of excuses for why nothing can be fixed.

Dave Methvin, member of the jQuery core team; President of the jQuery Foundation.

2012 update to the 2007 Cost of Monoculture in Korea

Back in 2007, I published the cost of monoculture, a blog post that was the first English-language explanation of the situation in South Korea where a series of independent decisions created a de facto monopoly for Microsoft Internet Explorer. The blog post was widely covered in 2007, in Salon, Slashdot, Boing Boing, etc.
Fast forward 5+ years to the late part of 2012 and basically nothing has changed. In fact, things are so bad in Korea that a candidate for the President of Korea, Ahn Cheol-soo, has taken the position that if he were voted in, he would abolish the laws that have locked Korea to Microsoft Internet Explorer.

Ahn Pledges To Wipe Out South Korea’s Outdated Internet Encryption Rule – Korea Real Time – WSJ

Internet Explorer becomes Korean election issue • The Register

Sure this candidate is from the IT/software field, but the fact that his platform has this position says that this is still a painful issue for most people in Korea today. It’s stunning that the Korean government has not proactively moved away from Active-X plugins when Microsoft themselves are deprecating this technology in Windows 8 and Internet Explorer 10.

 

my MozCamp EU 2012 mission

In preparation for my participation at MozCamp EU 2012, I’m working hard to promote two Engagement programs we’re launching. One is the Tiger Team project (which I’m working with Chelsea Novak on) where we are gathering quickly implementable and test-able ideas to support the promotion of Firefox desktop. The other is a program that we’re launching soon to enable Mozilla communities to come up with ideas to promote Firefox for Android (Fennec) which we would help fund and the communities would implement. Both of these are outlined in my Mission MozCamp page. I look forward to finding out who my buddy will be :)

browser competition in Korea in 2012

The Korea Times has a new article on the popularity of Google Chrome in Korea.

In Korea, though Internet Explorer is still overwhelming other top browsers such as Firefox, Safari and Maxthon, Chrome is beginning to emerge as a possible contender.

In April 2011, 91.93 percent of Korean users used Internet Explorer, while only 4.33 percent used Chrome. Some had never even heard of others browsers used overseas.

In April this year, Chrome accounted for 13.88 percent of domestic users, the only browser to reach the double digits to challenge Internet Explorer’s 78 percent.

Chrome gaining fast against Explorer

While it’s encouraging to see that browser competition in Korea is changing, I don’t understand this comment about “toolbars.”

Another downside of Internet Explorer, besides the need to agree to an authorized certificate for monetary transactions is the need to install toolbars. To access popular Web portals such as Naver or Daum, users are required to install provided toolbars, which are now considered cumbersome by those who have other new options open to them.

Chrome has the advantage of not needing tool bars, unlike Internet Explorer and Firefox, among others.

I don’t understand the requirement to download a toolbar in order to access a website. Is this a real requirement or just an attempt by the portal to push their toolbar onto the user? Maybe my Korean readers can help explain this?

 

Mozilla Myanmar at Barcamp Mandalay

Chit and Thanyawzinmin (Tin Aung Lin) from the Mozilla community in Myanmar recently represented Mozilla at BarCamp Mandalay. Please go over to Chit’s blog to read all about it!

https://ahkeno.wordpress.com/2012/02/06/mozilla-myanmar-at-barcamp-mandalay/

India community meetup at GNUnify ’12 in Pune

This is the formal announcement for a meetup of the Mozilla India community at GNUnify ’12 in Pune, the weekend of February 10-12. Mozilla will participate at GNUnify on Feb. 10 and 11, and the India community meetup will be held on Sunday, Feb. 12th.

  • Friday, February 10 – Mozilla participation at GNUnify ’12
  • Saturday, February 11 – Mozilla participation at GNUnify ’12
  • Sunday, February 12 – Mozilla India community meetup in Pune

The goal of this meetup on Feb. 12 is to gather the India community together for a number of objectives including:

  • establish the community structure
  • build road map for 2012
  • identify priorities for the community
  • bring together key localizers and other core and active contributors (including ReMo)
  • promote Mozilla in India

Arky and Axel from the l10n Drivers will be attending. I will be attending. We also hope to get a member from Developer Engagement to attend. More info to come when we have it.

Anyone who is active in the Mozilla India community is welcome to join this event. As Mozilla will not be providing any funding to attendees, we selected Pune as this location is home to the Red Hat team which has a number of key localization team leaders and members.

We will do our best to accommodate online participation via IRC but this will depend on local connectivity at the venue which is not yet determined. Information about the weekend will be posted here:

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Indiameetup2012

Vineel is helping to organize the weekend but we would love help from Mozilla community members in Pune for local support and knowledge. If you can help Vineel with planning, please contact him directly or post to the Community-India mailing list or Google Group interface.

The planning for the event will be discussed on the Community-India list (see above) so please join the list to participate.

See you in Pune!

Mozilla meetup in Cambodia Jan. 23

John O’Duinn’s Mozilla meetup in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Jan. 23rd has been confirmed:

We’ll be meeting at East-West Management Institute, House #43, Street 208, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Events formally go from 2pm-5pm Monday 23rd January, 2012; at 7pm, we’ll head over to Romdeng, House# 74, Street 174, Phnom Penh for dinner+drinks+chat.

If you are interested in helping to make the Khmer Firefox a reality, helping to promote Mozilla in Cambodia, please join John and Vannak and the EWMI team on Monday.

Khmer Firefox on Aurora; meetup in Cambodia