The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project

Jet Villegas

64

Shumway is an experimental web-native runtime implementation of the SWF file format. It is developed as a free and open source project sponsored by Mozilla Research. The project has two main goals:

1. Advance the open web platform to securely process rich media formats that were previously only available in closed and proprietary implementations.
2. Offer a runtime processor for SWF and other rich media formats on platforms for which runtime implementations are not available.

You can view live demo examples using Shumway. More adventurous users can download a Firefox beta build and install the test extension to preview SWF content on the web using Shumway. Please be aware that Shumway is very experimental, is missing features, contains many defects, and is evolving rapidly.

Mozilla’s mission is to advance the Open Web. We believe that we can offer a positive experience if we provide support for the SWF format that is still used on many web sites, especially on mobile devices where the Adobe Flash Player is not available.

The Open Web can be further advanced by making rich media capabilities, previously only available in Flash, also available in the native web browser stack. Shumway is an exciting opportunity to do that for SWF, and we welcome support from external contributors as we advance the technology. We are reaching out to technical users who are interested in contributing to the Shumway implementation in these five areas:

1. Core. This module includes the main file format parser, the rasterizer, and event system.
2. AVM1. JavaScript interpreter for ActionScript version 1 and version 2 bytecode.
3. AVM2.  JavaScript interpreter and JIT compiler for ActionScript version 3 bytecode.
4. Browser Integration handles the glue between the web browser and the Shumway runtime.
5. Testing/Demos. Add good demo and test files/links to Shumway.

More information can be found on the github links:
* https://github.com/mozilla/shumway/wiki
* https://github.com/mozilla/shumway/wiki/Running-the-Examples
* https://github.com/mozilla/shumway/wiki/Building-Firefox-Extension

The Shumway team is active on the #shumway IRC channel for real-time discussion. A technical mailing list is available here. The source code is available on github.

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  1. Pingback from Run Flash with JavaScript library Shumway | Leon Atkinson on ::

    […] The Shumway Open SWF Runtime Project […]

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  2. david mouton wrote on ::

    What’s the difference between this project and tamarin ?
    http://www-archive.mozilla.org/projects/tamarin/

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Tamarin is just the Actionscript 3 Virtual Machine. Shumway aims to render Flash content, including graphics, sound, video, Actionscript 1, 2 and 3.

      Reply

  3. don wrote on :

    Will this be useable on websites in all modern browsers or just Firefox?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Shumway is meant to render SWF content on browsers that have adequate JavaScript and HTML5 support–there’s nothing browser-specific about it. The Shumway extension add-on requires Firefox for browsing SWF content wrapped in embed and object tags.

      Reply

  4. Christophe Herreman wrote on ::

    I installed the extension in a beta build but cannot seem to run any Flash content. I tried various swf files and even compiled the race3 example. I see a blue Shumway button that appears but nothing more. Any idea?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Please post these questions to the mailing list. We have more people available to help there.

      Reply

  5. Jay Garcia wrote on :

    I loaded up my FF 17.0b1, installed the addon. I left my FlashBlock enabled as usual, went to my local newspaper web site with a lot of flash presentations. FlashBlock still worked with the round silver icon in the middle of the flash presentation but when I pressed the icon to play, it didn’t but there was the Shumway icon inside the flash screen and when pressed, the flash played just fine. This I really like, just thought I would pass this along. So far I don’t see anything amiss with Shumway loaded and running.

    Reply

  6. Jay Garcia wrote on :

    Sorry, I’m running FF 19.0a1 not 17

    Reply

  7. johnwerneken wrote on :

    EXCELLENT! Running Shumway watching listening and recording “Sympathy for the Devil”, Roling Stones Live 2009, right now in Firefox Beta 17.0. GOODBYE FLASH Goodbye Problems!

    Reply

  8. Sobhan Mohammadpour wrote on :

    what about lightspark and gnash ?

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    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Processing SWF content in C/C++ exposes the same security & device compatibility problems as the Adobe Flash Player. It also doesn’t help advance the Open Web stack (eg. faster javascript and canvas rendering) with the research work. Shumway aims to fill in the Open Web with features/capabilities that were previously only available in Flash.

      Reply

  9. drago01 wrote on :

    How does this handle videos?
    Does it decode them in javascript? Or just use the HTML5 video support for them (does not really help as most flash videos are H264).

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    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Shumway can use the codecs available on the system. Here’s an example that uses WebM video playing in a SWF video player (something the Adobe Flash Player cannot do.) Independently, we’re working on codec support (including H.264) across platforms.

      Reply

  10. Timothy Arceri wrote on :

    Have any of the Chrome or Opera developers shown interest in this project?

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    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Google and Opera employees have expressed interest, though they speak for themselves and not their employers.

      Reply

  11. Alberto Mardegan wrote on ::

    Hi Jet! While this is an excellent initiative for the users, I somehow feel it’s actually encouraging developers to use the proprietary Flash technology.
    How is your point of view on this matter?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Shumway aims to measure and extend the Open Web stack’s capabilities by using it to render Flash content. We don’t plan to render all Flash and have elected to stop at SWF version 10 and below, which we’ve determined is the vast majority of existing content. We expect developers will author new web content using Open Web technologies, but there’s still enough older SWF content out there to make it useful.

      Reply

  12. Arno Nym wrote on :

    Can this be considered a kind of wrapper that turns swf calls into html5 calls?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      You can think about it that way. :)

      Reply

  13. Linus wrote on :

    At my job, I’m currently working on an Adobe (now Apache) Flex application, it’s part of a large project that has been in development for a couple of years now and started well before Adobe decided to (slowly) pull the plug on Flash.
    Flex still has a place in my opinion, since it’s for building (web)applications, not webpages.
    My concern is that all the work is for nothing if we cannot count on Flex being supported for a long time.
    Now with Adobe having donated the Flex project to Apache, it should stay alive but it needs a decoder/player to work and currently that means Adobe Flash Player.
    Is this something that is considered with Shumway?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      The Shumway project is about building an Open Web SWF runtime. We’re still working on exposing the many API’s and features that will allow existing SWF content to render correctly. We’ll post a list of those features/API’s soon. That said, Flex applications tend to have a lot of UI complexity that may be better served for the long term by a full HTML5 conversion using CSS Flexbox or other application UI frameworks.

      Reply

  14. Andriy Kramar wrote on ::

    Will it be possible to capture video/audio and do something with it? Is there any way to do it in HTML5+Javascript, btw? I’ve tried to find some hints on this topic, but without big success.

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      We’re working on it…
      http://dev.w3.org/2011/webrtc/editor/getusermedia.html

      Reply

  15. Alias Cummins wrote on ::

    Hi there,

    I’m doing a presentation at the London Flash Platform User group about this – I think it’s a great idea and hope you guys succeed.

    One question though – it is / will it be possible to create a js wrapper which will sniff the device capabilities, then play back the swf content on a device where the swf player is not available, without using the extension? This would be *extremely* useful, and would ensure the support of a large community of developers, as it solves a lot of commercial deployment headaches.

    Let me know!
    Alias Cummins

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Yes, you can certainly host the Shumway javascript code and conditionally toggle Shumway or the Adobe Flash Player using document.write() or other methods.

      Reply

  16. Noah Fect wrote on :

    So, Mozilla has insufficient resources to maintain x64 Firefox as a first-class project, but there are apparently plenty of resources available for keeping a retrograde technology like Flash on life support.

    Got it.

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      The Shumway project is about advancing the Open Web to do what only Flash could do in the past. For all the hype about HTML5 replacing Flash, Shumway aims to validate the web platform by rendering Flash content using only Open Web technologies. Your concerns about (Windows?) x64 Firefox builds are discussed in a different public forum. Please direct your feedback there.

      Reply

  17. William Hay wrote on ::

    How does this differ from Gnash and Lightspark?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Both Gnash and Lightspark are browser plugins written in C++/C. Shumway is written in JavaScript and rendered in HTML5 canvas.

      Reply

  18. crapiera wrote on :

    Good initiative. Thanks Mozilla

    Reply

  19. Mauricio wrote on :

    As a Flex developer and user I see a lot of potential here. There are many Flex applications that could use this and run in all platforms that support HTML5 but don’t support Flash. Flex is still very good and much faster to create business applications (compared to traditional HTML/JavaScript/CSS), we could use this technology and replace Flash completely while still using the Flex framework. And normally Flex applications are more about forms, panels, grids, etc; not much about fancy vector drawings and animations so even if there is a performance hit by using JavaScript, they will still execute fast enough and users will not care I think.

    Reply

  20. Duran wrote on :

    Tried Shumway, getting the same problem as Adobe’s Flash with no video only audio.

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      We’re still working on audio and video. Please add the URL to https://github.com/mozilla/shumway/issues

      Reply

  21. Gamed wrote on :

    I don’t appreciate this on desktop.

    If it is to be enabled by default for mobile only, then it’s a praise worthy initiative.
    But on desktop ? NO. It’s a quite disrespectful towards the work done by Adobe, but primarily the consequence is that it will reduce the penetration of Flash Player desktop plugin over time, because much less content will require it.

    It will affect web games. We don’t want that.

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      The penetration of the Adobe Flash Player desktop plugin will degrade over time. That will occur independently of Shumway. Adobe knows this and they have dramatically reduced their engineering investment in Flash Player and increased investment in Open Web technologies. Adobe and Mozilla share common interests here.

      Reply

      1. Gamed wrote on :

        That’s an arguable opinion. We can barely see what’s further ahead than 5 years and, considering that Flash 11 auto-updates silently, I would say that it’s almost certain it will still be ubiquitous in 5 years save from initiatives such as this one. On Desktop, all Shumway creates is more fragmentation.

        So long as newly bought PC are exposed to SWF content (present everywhere), Flash will remain ubiquitous. It’s actually a good thing, see my reply to your post from April 4 12:29am, below, where I kind of develop why it is so.

        Reply

        1. Timothy Arceri wrote on :

          “primarily the consequence is that it will reduce the penetration of Flash Player desktop plugin over time, because much less content will require it”

          We can only hope this is true. The sooner the better in my opinion, flash just limits the web to certain platforms even on the desktop (Linux plugin has been discontiued) while providing extra security issues for users. Flash content is declining rapidly compared to a couple of yours ago its much easier to get by without flash at all.

          In that past year alone websites that use flash have dropped by 5% from 25% of all websites to 20% see: http://w3techs.com/technologies/overview/client_side_language/all

          This of course is only one source but it shows the decline is at a very rapid pace, at this pace it would no longer be in use in your 5 year example (at least to a point were the average user doesnt need to worry about having it installed)

          Reply

          1. Gamed wrote on :

            It must be wrong enough that Mozilla devotes some of its limited resources and manpower to Shumway, which purpose is to read Flash 10- content instead of Flash. But even if it has some truth, i.e. less content is made that needs Flash ABSOLUTELY, it doesn’t mean that Flash ubiquity is in danger. (breaking news: it isn’t ;) )

            Back to your post Timothy, about your claim that “the sooner Flash disappears the better”, “because Linux” doesn’t have updates above 11.2, that sounds vindictive rather than a fair point. Also over-dramatization since we are “only” at 11.7 and a year has passed, i.e. you can get like 100% of Flash content running in Firefox, and straight 100% in Chrome which keeps an up-to-date Flash Player.

            Besides, what makes you think JavaScript is any good as an alternative today, aside from uneducated hype around the state of “HTML5″ techs. I speak on behalf of an independent game development studio when I say we’re not going to waste time and suffer through developing on this. It’s just not ready. I don’t know if it will ever be worth considering as a MAIN target, possibly not, it’s hard to say, that’s why it’s not a clever move to shoot at Flash because Flash IS worth that spot right NOW. ;)

            (I use caps because I’m not sure these comments accept HTML or BBCode to underline stuff)

          2. Timothy Arceri wrote on :

            I simply pointed out the discontinued support of the Linux plugin as an example to show you that Flash is not a very good option for multiplatform nothing vindictive just fact, even Android support has now be dropped. Your company is limiting itself by developing for flash, why would you invest heavly in a dieing platform. You also seem to have missed (or ignored) my second point that for the average (non-gaming) user flash no longer provides any real advantages for web browsing but brings a whole bunch of extra security issues.

            That said I really dont know what you problem with shumway is. If your games need flash support just get your clients to install it I dont think anyone is saying that flash should be blocked from being installed.

  22. Gamed wrote on :

    (Modern web games necessitate Flash Player 11+. Canvas won’t cut it)

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      HTML5 Web Gaming is advancing faster than the Adobe Flash Player.

      Reply

      1. Gamed wrote on :

        I read that earlier. That doesn’t matter until “HTML5 Web Gaming” is ready for fast development of games AND cross browser and cross device consistency AND decent protection of source code and assets. Doesn’t fit in either of those domains.

        We have a wonderful tool that’s available everywhere, with Flash. Let’s not bury it before it has actually become obsolete. Please do not enable Shumway by default on Desktop before Flash has actually phased out and lost market penetration by itself, which ain’t going to occur within the next five years.

        The technology isn’t important. What’s important is to be able to deploy high quality games on any device or desktop browser for minimal costs (both of development tools and time). The desktop plugin is the only one that can fill that gap today and, while Shumway is a respectable initiative on mobile, it’s going to hinder the rise of a cool, young and huge market if enabled by default.

        Reply

        1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

          I’m glad you’re happy with Flash as a development tool–I worked on it for several years at Macromedia and Adobe. The web hasn’t caught up with a number of features that Flash supports and we’re quickly implementing those as we discover the gaps in Shumway.

          I would exercise caution if you’re developing desktop-only web games using Flash today. Some very smart and creative game developers have cited that platform choice as a key point of failure:
          http://killscreendaily.com/articles/news/glitch-creative-flash-mmo-reaches-its-end/

          Reply

      2. Gamed wrote on :

        Well regarding that point, it’s always interesting to see successes and failures. But for each failure you show me I can show you a success, because just like in other domains the chances a new enterprise has to survive more than 5 years is statistically 50%.

        Blaming it on technology used is a tough one though. They failed and that sucks, but considering the Flash Player has not lost any penetration and is still ubiquitous, I don’t think they have a point in blaming it. Now indeed, a lot of gaming occurs on devices nowadays but

        1/ It’s not the same kind of gaming, on mobile particularly, and
        2/ Just because you target browser desktops with an MMO doesn’t mean you can’t deploy the same code on AIR with limited modifications. They didn’t, they had only one client. I’m not sure it was a reason why they failed, but that’s certainly a risk you can’t afford when you have the possibility to deploy to almost every platform and device. If you use Flash/Air, modifications of the code base are few and are mostly centered around performance and controls. You can’t get any better in terms of time, costs and workflow if you want cross platform. Bigger companies will have the means to fully port code, but not Indies.
        3/ It’s kind of a bad bet to develop specifically for the app stores nowadays, as revenues are not long-lasting, and marketing costs have skyrocketed to insane levels. If you really have to target ONE platform, you say you wouldn’t bet on browser gaming but I certainly wouldn’t bet on app stores either. Not unless I have an enormous budget, but then I’d target many platforms and all devices.

        Anyway the case study of this enterprise and its failure is an interesting topic, and I’d be happy to discuss it with you in parallel to the main one, which is Shumway Vs Flash on desktop browsers.

        So back to that, what are your REAL reasons to want to enable Shumway by default there ? I’ll try to address some in advance because our discussion has been very scattered in time so far :/
        A/ You say security, but with plugin container and Flash Player’s protected mode and monthly updates, I say it’s not THAT important. At least it cannot outweigh the benefits of having Flash.
        B/ You say stability, but Firefox doesn’t crash or hangs anymore when a Flash developer did it wrong.
        C/ You say battery life for laptops, but any interactive content will take some, it doesn’t matter whether it runs in Flash or Canvas or JS/HTML/CSS. Having javascript apps everywhere is what wastes my battery today, where Flash needs a click to be activated and we have heavy javascript running in all major sites (btw thanks NoScript; good for security too, JS has a big attack surface)

        I cannot see reasons valid enough to outweigh the benefits that Flash is the only one to provide in desktop browsers, today and for the next 5 years to come. Do you have other points than those ?

        Reply

        1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

          When I first started working at Macromedia, the best-selling product was Director and it had a huge market share of the interactive CD-ROM market and also had a decent web browser plug-in. People were using arguments similar to yours about how Flash shouldn’t exist because it would kill the Director business. There were many developers who chose to stick with Director because it was quite good at what it did–many years ahead of Flash in terms of capabilities. So, I really sympathize with you, and your desire to keep it alive–I was a Director user too. Everyone who used to work on Flash at Adobe is now working on Open Web standards. They’re working with Mozilla to extract the best of Flash and bring those capabilities to the Open Web.

          To restate: Our goal is 100% about advancing the Open Web. Shumway aims to help that by identifying the gaps in the web stack that Flash enabled in the past. When we find gaps we implement them using Open Web standards on desktop and mobile platforms.

          Of course, you’re free to use whatever technologies you see fit for your purpose: Director, Flash, HTML, etc. I wish you the best in your future development plans.

          Reply

        2. Gamed wrote on :

          To be clear, I’m not a flash developer. I use Haxe. I see the Flash runtimes as a fantastic platform to target.

          Now it’s a tough one to compare Flash’s situation with Director. The whole CD-ROM market fell under its feet, so of course Director came down with it. Its plugin never spread enough due to a lack of content on the web.

          Flash and Air currently stand on solid ground.

          Then you talk about HTML5 technologies as a replacement. They are LANGUAGE standards, not PLATFORMS like Flash, so not unlike C++ standard which is implemented differently on Mac and Windows, HTML5 tech is subject to how the different platforms it runs on implement it. We’ve seen that in the past, only a subset of the language can be safely used cross platform (i.e. cross browser for HTML5, cross OS for C++); for more complex stuff required by games, you have to know the intricacies of each platform and cope with them, which costs a lot of money, time and manpower and is plain boring.

          Only good dev tools have a hope of smoothing that up somewhat, by targeting several platforms from the same codebase, but 1/ I know from experience it’s never as smooth as advertised, and 2/ HTML5 dev tools are way too young to be ready as illustrated by LinkedIn dropping HTML5 this month. Both they, the standard and their implementations need a minimum of 5 years, IMHO.

          Even then, 15 years of web dev has not been enough to completely smooth out HTML4- development, which is why Flash became so popular on the web. (Accessible, reliable cross browsers, fun to work with, doesn’t need super skills, packable in one file; this led to many Flash content spawning all over the web and made Flash penetration what it is today)

          Thanks for your wishes. I wish you well as well. Where Flash is unavailable Shumway is good. In helping you learn more about Flash capabilities, Shumway is good. Just please rediscuss internally how Shumway’s default enable status on desktop.

          Farewell :)

          Reply

  23. argonvegell wrote on :

    Since Adobe is not upgrading the Flash Player for Linux, and has instead implemented the latest Flash Player on Google Chrome on Linux instead, I’m hopeful that Shumway would replace Adobe Flash Player for Linux users who are loyal to Firefox, because I’ve tried Google Chrome, it sucks, I got a headache setting it up, Firefox is way easier to use. Would Shumway be able to play Facebook games such as Candy Crush Saga, Chefville, CityVille, Bubble Safari?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      Getting Flash games working well is a key goal for Shumway, even as we advance HTML5 gaming with technologies like asm.js, emscripten, and WebGL. I can’t comment on specific game titles we’ll support in Shumway.

      Reply

  24. Rolf wrote on :

    Will Shumway be able to handle the kind of picky flash player tests many web sites do? Like, Youtube. “No, we think you don’t have a flash player, or at least not the right flash player, so we won’t even let you try to view this video clip.”

    I use Firefox with Video Download Helper, and Opera with Savefrom.net helper, so I can still download the video clips and view them with VLC (and sometimes the clips start running in the browser anyway, in spite of the flash test), but I’d call that a workaround.

    cheers,
    Rolf

    Reply

    1. Andy wrote on :

      YT rarely does that!
      However, since there are many gamers around here participating in the discussions, let me point out one crucial thing that constantly causes problems for users that do NOT want to install the latest version (e. g. because the previous one had a greater stability):

      MochiCrypt!

      Nearly every Flash game that uses the Mochi stuff (i. e. the preloader) often refuses to load under Flash 10.X even though the game decrypted by it would run perfectly on it. Mochi’s Flash version checking is very unforgiving, that is to say it doesn’t bother parsing for any previous versions, not even a small couple.

      Reply

  25. Thomas Michael Hood wrote on ::

    I’m having trouble using Shumway on Newgrounds & deviantART.

    Reply

  26. Andre wrote on :

    Now I dont know if I stop developing in AS3 and move to Javascript and HTML5 or stay with AS3, but what a great project, why doesn´t adobe support this?

    Reply

    1. Andre wrote on :

      We here have thousands of LMS courses that use Flash as a standard animation and simulation engine.
      Does Shumway can test our swf? There´s a upload page something similar?

      Reply

      1. Angel wrote on :

        I share the same feelings, I know most Flash Developers went through it too, the feeling of doubt for the technology, it affected all of us. Like you, my main tool was flash/AS2/AS3/XML, I was an interactive developer before, part of my job was to create interactive elearning contents / coursewares, but since the whole ban of the flash player for iOS devices and Adobe ending it’s Flash Player support for all mobile devices, things really started to look messed up for my future career, so I decided that it’s time to focus on HTML5/JS /CSS, I’m still trying to learn it now, and I believe that You can never go wrong with learning new things especially when you’re feeling unsure about the future of Flash as most of us feel, so do learn HTML5, but I’m so glad that moz is not giving up on the format because it really brings richness to the browser, some/most of it will take a while to do in HTML5, but we will all get there, hopefully both technologies will be able to co-exist. Thanks moz! any updates on this project? Is it still on going?

        Reply

        1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

          Shumway has landed in Firefox Nightly builds. We’re still working on it. Visit the github page for more info.

          Reply

      2. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

        Install the Shumway extension in Firefox and try it.

        Reply

  27. sanjeev wrote on :

    Hi,

    I have been testing my swf files with Shumway and most of the files are just works fine however some issues are in with AS3 and global issues with audio (AS2+AS3).

    Complex AS2 and AS3 have some issues but that is OK no issues with animation

    One thing I notice that I am able to run swf only which is published using adobe flash but it doesn’t works with any swf file which is published using Adobe Flash Builder (FLEX).

    is it true?

    Reply

    1. Jet Villegas wrote on ::

      SWF content that use the Flex SDK should seriously consider converting the application to HTML5 directly (without Shumway) as this allows you to use web-native controls that take advantage of web platform features (eg. accessibility, spell-check, etc.) We may enable Flex apps in Shumway in the future, but that is not a priority–games and other interactive media currently take precedence.

      Reply

      1. Deepak MS wrote on :

        Hi Jet,
        You mentioned that ‘We may enable Flex apps in Shumway in the future’. As per my understanding, Shumway would replace Flash Player dependency. If Shumway would act like a flash player, but natively, then why can’t flex applications run on Shumway? Because both flash and flex applications run on same flash player. They wont be running on different flash player versions right?

        Just trying to understanding, why just flash applications and not flex? :)

        Cheers!
        Deepak

        Reply

  28. Ross Stuart wrote on :

    Hi, I just had a simple question: Will Shumway eventually make its way into Firefox for Android and Firefox OS and, if so, will it be able to play Swf files from desktop versions of websites?

    I ask because I am able to use Adobe Flash Player on my Nexus 4 and would like to be able to ditch it, but I want to be able to view all my web content through my phone. If you guys can pull that off, you’ll really validate my faith in your foundation (which is already very high).

    Reply

  29. Dmitry wrote on :

    Are there any tutorials on how to use it in a real projects? I was looking into code and feeling a bit confused ((

    Reply

  30. Scott Humphrey wrote on :

    I’m going to keep a close on eye on this. I work at an e-learning company that has a huge library of content built in Flash and we’re getting an increase in requests for iPad and Tablet compatibility. To convert our stuff to HTML5/JS etc would require a huge amount of money and resources (and a bunch of other problems), so if this works out well this will be a god send.

    Reply

  31. Dan wrote on ::

    Jet,

    This is truly exceptional work.

    Thanks,

    Reply

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