Localized screencasts perform better – go figure

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

I created this video about bookmarks for Firefox 29. It’s in English and has closed captions for a few languages, including German. But you can see from this audience retention data that German speakers don’t watch the video as much as English speakers.
english

So, with Kadir‘s help, I made a German version (above). You can see that this video performs much better in German speaking locales. Of course this is what we expected but it’s cool to see how plainly it shows up.
german

Note: Rewinding and re-watching can result in values higher than 100%.

I LOVE this education piece on the Firefox home page

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

As part of all the work we’ve done letting people know what’s great about the new Firefox, we started running a campaign on the default Firefox start page last week. The first piece was about bookmarks – this week it’s customization. I love this Space Invaders animation and the page it links to. It’s fun, it’s engaging, it gives you enough detail to be truly helpful and it links to the full documentation on the support site.

User Education in everything we do

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

At the Mozilla Summit, Mitchell and Mark talked about education as one of the pillars that underlies our mission. To paraphrase Mark,

“We need to make sure that the whole of the web understands what the web can do for them so they can use it to make their lives better.”

One way we do this is through Webmaker. Right there on webmaker.org it says, we’re dedicated to teaching web literacy. The big Webmaker projects right now (Thimble, X-Ray Goggles, Popcorn) are mainly focused on the “building” literacy. I think the other literacies – exploring and connecting – are also extremely important and possibly relevant to a wider group of people as they include the very basic skills of using a browser (navigation, search, security, privacy, sharing and collaborating).

I also think we have a great opportunity to address exploring and connecting, not only as Webmaker projects, but built right into our products and the experiences that surround them. For example, one of the findings of our North American user type study was that simplified, integrated (in the browser as opposed to the help site), help and support would be a direct thing we could do to help Evergreens and Busy Bees. And, taken together, Evergreens and Busy Bees (plus hybrids that include these types) are our largest group accounting for about 36% of users.

So what would it look like to build user education into everything we do? Well, this new update experience is one example. It might also look like Facebook posts, newsletters, search results, installation dialogs or the product documentation on mozilla.org. This year I’ll begin to work full-time on developing and testing approaches. As a former teacher, the exciting part for me will be what we learn from people. As Mitchell says in the video above,

“Most good teachers will tell you that if you try to teach, you end up learning.”

I couldn’t agree more.

Building a new Firefox update experience

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

Last week I introduced the new Firefox update experience that we’re working on. Since then, we’ve had a few days together in San Francisco to work out a new version (the first version was done last summer). So check out the video above for a walk-though of our progress and the video below for a few scenes of us working together this last week.

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

Making the user manual disappear

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

Some fine morning next spring (or next fall for the other side of the earth), people will open Firefox and find that it has a whole new look. A gorgeous new tab strip that makes it easy to focus on what you’re doing. A bookmark star and bookmark menu sitting right next to each other and a new, visual Firefox menu that’s super easy to customize. And on that day, they’ll also see a message drop down from the new menu button, inviting them to take a tour of these new features. This week I’m super super excited to be in San Francisco to work with a bunch of great people (Zhenshou, Holly, Jen, Laura, Michael, Alex and Blair) on building that tour.

So let me tell you my version of how this came to be.

This is a slide from a Kathy Sierra presentation. It’s my favorite presentation slide ever. This is what I came to Mozilla to do. Actually, what I’d love is for people to not even realize they’re reading the manual. Have it so integrated into the whole Firefox experience ecosystem that it kind of disappears.

Over the last few years I’ve been working on that in a couple of different ways. One is that we re-purpose or link to support stuff everywhere. All over Firefox, the website, our blogs, Facebook and Twitter and even sometimes in the stories written about us by others. It’s become a whole thing now that just happens and I don’t always hear about it until after the fact. Like the time Facebook did it and sent millions to one article.

Another project I work on is the Firefox Reset. When I first started working on support, the last resort for helping someone was often creating a new profile and migrating their important data over. That is Wizard level stuff! So with the Reset we turned it into a super fast, one-click-easy thing that even a Busy Bee can love. And now if Firefox takes a long time to start or if you try it again after having given up on it for a couple of months we’ll suggest you use the reset to make Firefox brand new – but without loosing all the stuff you care about. How cool is that?

Ok. Still with me. Here’s the thing I’m getting at. This update experience, like those other projects, is part of my master plan to make the user manual disappear.

A little more than a year ago, knowing that this new version of Firefox was happening, I got a bunch of people together to start talking about what we could do to get users excited about it and make sure they saw the new features. So there will be a whole coordinated effort to talk about it before, during and after. Of course, as part of that there’s a ton of new support material that will need to be created – new articles, screenshots, videos. But the big new thing that I’m super excited about is this new update experience which is key part.

The idea is, when Firefox starts up after having updated, a message will drop down from the new menu button inviting you to take a tour. Of course you can dismiss it but in the process of doing that, you just learned about that new menu. You see what we did there? And if you choose to take the tour well show off few Firefox tricks. But check this out. Our web-based tour is able to interact with Firefox – like we can open that new menu and highlight stuff in there. I think it’s going to great.

So is it marketing? Is it support? A website? The product? The UI? The UX? Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes and yes! It’s all of that and more. Like getting chocolate in your peanut butter or peanut butter in your chocolate.

So check back next week for demo time! And then soon, hopefully for lots more – like a new, new user experience.

The importance of user education and onboarding

Planet Mozilla viewers – you can watch this video on YouTube.

I’m at the Mozilla Summit in Brussels this weekend. This afternoon during the “Framing the Future” session, a question was asked about what we’re doing to help less technical users and what we’re doing to avoid alienating existing users. This video has David Ascher talking about what was learned from missing the opportunity to educate and onboard users for the Thunderbird 3 launch. He goes on to talk about how important it is that we get better at this and that he expects that we’ll be doing this with the introduction of Australis (Firefox redesign).

This is something that I’m deeply passionate about. I wrote about this last December just after I had begun organizing a cross-functional meeting to see what we could do to solve this very issue. I’m super excited to say that we are moving ahead with building an brand new update experience for Firefox users that we’ll use to help smooth the transition to Australis when it launches early next year. I’ll be sharing more about that soon.