Showcasing Impact Mozilla Finalists, Part II

Ken Kovash

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For reference, please check out Part I of this series.  Here in Part II, we’ll look at the following two finalists of Impact Mozilla – “My Firefox” and “Customization Campaign”.

My Firefox

“My Firefox” attempts to get new Firefox users immediately addicted by altering/customizing the download experience.  The plans sums it up by stating, “The download page should therefore be laid out in such a way that it would be impossible for the user to get away with a straight download without having him wondering whether he’s really doing the right thing.”

To accomplish this, the Firefox download process would be modified to walk a new user through the following steps:

  1. Specifying the target O.S.
  2. Customizing the look
  3. Selecting the scenarios
  4. Configuring the browser
  5. Managing the bookmarks
  6. Register (optional)
  7. Preparing and downloading the installer
  8. Done!

Customization Campaign

The “Customization Campaign” is unique in that it heavily engages the SpreadFirefox community.  The plan aims to increase Firefox loyalty via customization, and more specifically, through increased adoption of add-ons.  Such an effort would be accomplished by a marketing campaign on the default Firefox start page.

Targeting would be driven by viral campaigns and community activism, all of which would be supported by new tools on the SpreadFirefox site.  Furthermore, the plan outlines strategies for strengthening Mozilla’s marketing community at SpreadFirefox by resolving remaining site structure challenges and by presenting consistent messages of goals and incentives to members.

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  1. Ted Mielczarek wrote on ::

    “The download page should therefore be laid out in such a way that it would be impossible for the user to get away with a straight download without having him wondering whether he’s really doing the right thing.”

    That sounds kind of crappy to me. I think your A/B studies showed that any tiny change can negatively impact download rates, so why would we do anything to make it harder for people to download? Is it that vital to get people using addons?

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