Regional communities and Reps in 2016

Full static version is on the wiki and its conversation on discourse, feel free to point there anyone that might be interested.

What got shipped

from the Reps and Regional Communities Team

Index

  • Executive summary
  • The Team
  • Release notes

Executive summary

Our two objectives for 2016 were:

  1. A focus set of relevant training and learning opportunities for mobilizers are systematized and they regularly access these opportunities to be more effective in their contributions and as a result providing more impact to Mozilla’s main initiatives.
  2. Reps is the program for most core volunteers where many communities feel their voice represented and influencing the organization, and where mozillians join to be more aligned, grow their skills and be more impactful in mobilizing others.

During 2016, the Reps and Regional communities team delivered:

  • A coaching training material to systematize training and coaching support to core mobilizers and communities, starting to be completely volunteer-driven in 2017.
  • An initial Leadership toolkit tailored to invest on the main identified skills our core mobilizers need to support Mozilla’s focus initiatives and areas.
  • Five in-person community gatherings in our top focus regions (Brazil, India, Europe, Arabic and Mexico) to test, iterate and deliver these coaching and leadership opportunities to key core mobilizers, as well as document and systematize this effort to allow volunteer to run their own local ones by themselves in 2017.
  • Support the creation (and regular update) of Activate Mozilla, a site to summarize the main focus areas for Mozilla (Rust, Servo, Test Pilot, WebVR, Internet Issues…) and how to provide value through activities co-created with functional partners.
  • Clear alignment, re-activation and impact delivery from the five focus communities, re-energizing and providing value to organization goals with Activate Mozilla activities during 2016 and helping them to come up with aligned plans for 2017 to support focus projects, including future partnerships with local organizations.
  • Alignment and impact delivery from regional communities around the world, with our Reps mobilizing almost 150 activities and events in more than 23 countries in the last 4 months supporting Test Pilot, Webcompat, Rust, Addons and E10s 2016 team goals.
  • A big update to Mozilla Reps (RepsNext) to evolve the program by supporting all these learning opportunities and becoming the main alignment, leadership, mobilizing and backbone force at the volunteer community (improving internal processes, mentors, coaching and regional representation/support).
  • Expand the support to our core contributors communications by enabling a discussion channel for NDA volunteers and staff and keeping core mobilizers in the loop with the organization communications, direction and encouraging conversations.
  • 100% increase in the positive sentiment about Reps program and Participation from our core mobilizers, as well as a very positive re-activation, engagement and alignment with 35 local communities thanks to Reps Regional Coaches.

The team


Release notes

December 30, 2016 (Q4HB4)

  • The Reps Review Team managed to reduce the budget approval time by 30%, this means that now it’s easier than ever for volunteers to request resources to support their activities.
  • Data from our last community survey shows that in the past 6 months we had a 100% increase in the positive sentiment about Reps program and Participation from our core mobilizers.
  • The coaching training material is available for anyone to use and will enable to systematize coaching training and be volunteer-driven thanks to the first cohort of new coaches we trained.
  • The Leadership Toolkit has now generated 13 new workshops and has a solid group of core contributors with a strong background developing and testing the material.

December 2, 2016 (Q4HB3)

November 11, 2016 (Q4HB2)

  • We held the Mexico Community Gathering in Mexico City, with a clear focus on reactivating the community, solving conflicts and aligning with the focus priorities.
  • 10 existing Reps Mentors began the new coaching training, expanding this way our coaching efforts to the existing mentor group in an effort to refresh and improve their skills.
  • At least 35 local communities showed a very positive sentiment about the re-activation, alignment and support from the Reps Regional Coaches.

October 21, 2016 (Q4HB1)

  • There is now a wiki page where the budget allocation of the Reps program is explained each quarter, a transparency effort and also a way to signal Reps about the priority areas at Mozilla.
  • Reps Regional Coaches were provided with training on coaching and conflict resolution an identified need to better perform in their work with communities.
  • The Arabic Community Gathering took place in Casablanca, Morocco, reactivating, aligning and improving the community health.
  • The plan for systematizing coaching training was presented with the initial learnings from the work we have done so far.

September 23, 2016 (Q3HB3)

  • The European Community Gathering took place, with special focus on reactivating communities and align with the Copyright campaign.
  • The first cohort of Reps Coaches started their work onboarding new Reps.
  • Reps Regional Coaches started their work meeting with all Mozilla local communities as a way to understand their current status, needs and align them.
  • The new Reps Review Team started to operate as an administrative body to review and approve the resource requests from the community and align the allocation with the current priorities. This body is accountable and overseen by the Reps Council.

August 26, 2016 (Q3HB2)

Mozilla Festival 2016 in Asia

This post is written by by Noriatsu Kudo of Mozilla Japan with help from volunteer community space stewards.

On October 29th/30th 2016, the Mozilla Festival was held in London. The Festival is an annual event on Education, Journalism, Science, Openness and many other areas we have been working on with people all over the world. This year, as a trial session, the Mozilla communities in Jakarta, Manila, Taipei, and Mozilla Japan took part. Supported by the Participation Team, the 3 volunteer-run physical community spaces and Mozilla Japan office all located in Asia were connected to London during the opening day of Mozilla Festival.

The reasons why we came up with this idea are:

1) Geolocation disadvantage of Mozillians in Asia for Mozfest
2) Diversity of people/language and localization at Mozfest

First of all, from Asia, London is very far and it costs a lot for us to travel to MozFest. Therefore participants from Asia are much less comparing to EU participants. However there are a large number of people interested in the festival and in Mozilla’s work in the above fields.

Secondly, diversity in languages and localization were one of the focus topics this year. Therefore, I wanted to bring even more languages and people from different regions with their activities to MozFest.

Connected Spaces at MozFest

Connected Spaces at MozFest

From Local to Global

To make this happen, I discussed it with volunteers who run community spaces. From a technical point of view, it is quite easy to connect locations with video conference system and just broadcast talks from MozFest. However, remote participants are not same condition comparing to the local participants in the venue, and most of Asian participants are not English native speakers. Therefore, localization of the event was needed.

We first agreed on that conversation and discussion with others in their native language is important. Therefore, we decided to host a small events at each community space, and inter-connect those events. In this way, participants can join discussion even if they are not fluent enough to discuss in English. Also, because of time difference between Europe and Asia, we choose to held this event on Saturday, morning in London, and afternoon to night in Asia.

London Event

(by Noriatsu Kudo and Brian King)

There were two types of session in London. One was the broadcasting of “opening session and Speaker Series” using AirMozilla and Facebook Live. The other was a session to receive presentations from Asia using a video conferencing system.

The Opening session and Speaker Series were viewed in each community space and participants had a conversation about the content. In total, over 50 participants in Asia joined this public view style session.

The video conference part was held as a “Connecting remotely to global communities” session in the localization space. In this session Tokyo, Taipei, Jakarta, and Manila gave a short presentation about activities in each country. We have delivered four countries and four more languages to the festival to increase diversity of people and more participation. However, this was just a trial. Based on the satisfaction of remote participants, we would like to expand and improve on this type of participation all over the world.

Taipei Event

(by lrvin Chen)

In Community Space in Taipei, 12 Mozillians gathered together to watch the opening and live speaker sessions from MozFest. The opening remarks from Mark Surman resonated with the participants who had never been to MozFest not only because of his recent visit of Taipei community space, but also the free and open atmosphere and the energy of partcipants at MozFest.

MozFest 2016 遠端連線派對

After the live opening, we invite Franklin and Eric Sun from “ezgo” project to introduce how we promote FLOSS in basic education. There are many good and open educational materials (For example, Stellarium for astronomy, GeoGebra in mathematics and Avogadro in chemicals), and ezgo is a Linux distrubition designed to gather all of those materials and apps in one place for teachers and students. MozTW (Mozilla Taiwan Community) had co-work with OSSACC, the organization behind ezgo for many years, and we’re happy to introducing our experience to Mozillians around the world.

MozFest 2016 遠端連線派對

The second half of the event in Taipei had board games, food and social time. We had played a new crowdfunding “programming board game” – 海霸 King of Pirates by 程式老爹 papacode. It’s designed to teach the logic behind programming to kids from k-12, and even better, it’s open to download free (under by-nc-sa license). And we also shared some tasty Japanese, Indonesian and Philippines food, and had a good time socialising with people from other spaces in front of connected camera.

MozFest 2016 遠端連線派對 - 海霸桌遊

See more photos and check the Taipei community space’s website.

Jakarta Event

(by Yofie Setiawan)

In the Mozilla Community Space Jakarta, we have 11 attendees who join the Mozilla Festival 2016 Inter-connected Community Spaces session. We are really excited to see the live streaming of what happening in Mozilla Festival 2016 in London, UK. Beside, we also excited to the join the talks on other Mozilla Community Spaces, in Tokyo, Manila, Taipei, and London. From Jakarta, we share talks about WebVR which presented by Kiki, and Indonesian Food presentation by Rara. While for local talk, we share about the Mozilla Community and the Mozilla Community Space. We also play few games to have fun with everyone who came for the event.

Manila Event

(by Bob Reyes)

In the Mozilla Community Space Manila, most of the attendees were students from outside of the metropolis, visiting MozSpaceMNL for the first time. The community space was packed with more than fifty Mozillians eager to watch the livestream. While waiting for the live feed from London, participants were treated to a film showing of “Code Rush” followed by a short talk about Mozilla in the Philippines. The talks were then followed by a live viewing of the opening session of Mozilla Festival direct from London, UK.

Tokyo Event

(by Dynamis [Tomoya Asai] and Gunmar)

In Tokyo, there were 20 participants partcipated the event.  From Tokyo, Gecko embedded project and CHIRIMEN Open Hardware community gave their presentations. It was a great opportunity to share what Japanese community are doing and exchange information with other community groups in Japan.

 

The Mozilla Community Spaces Project

This project is supported by Brian King and the Community Development Team. The volunteer based community spaces in Asia opened their doors in 2014. It’s an experiment to create a free and open space for people who passionate about the open web, to attract more talent into Mozilla, to strengthen local communities, and to see what great things would happen.

Acknowledgments

This activity was successful because of the support of the following people…

  • Heather Bailey, space wrangler of localization space for coordination of the session at London.
  • Richard A Milewski and the Air Mozilla team for great live stream of sessions
  • Melissa Romaine of Mozilla Foundation for the advice to make the session better.
  • All of the Mozfest team for their support and great opportunity.
  • Partcipants who joined the session from Asia, without you, it was impossible!

Firefox 50 new contributors

With the release of Firefox 50, we are pleased to welcome the 43 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 32 of whom were brand new volunteers! Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic individuals, and take a look at their contributions:

Maker Party 2016: Stand Up for a Better Internet

Cross post from: The Mozilla Blog.

Mozilla’s annual celebration of making online is challenging outdated copyright law in the EU. Here’s how you can participate.

It’s that time of year: Maker Party.

Each year, Mozilla hosts a global celebration to inspire learning and making online. Individuals from around the world are invited. It’s an opportunity for artists to connect with educators; for activists to trade ideas with coders; and for entrepreneurs to chat with makers.

This year, we’re coming together with that same spirit, and also with a mission: To challenge outdated copyright laws in the European Union. EU copyright laws are at odds with learning and making online. Their restrictive nature undermines creativity, imagination, and free expression across the continent. Mozilla’s Denelle Dixon-Thayer wrote about the details in her recent blog post.

By educating and inspiring more people to take action, we can update EU copyright law for the 21st century.

Over the past few months, everyday internet users have signed our petition and watched our videos to push for copyright reform. Now, we’re sharing copyright reform activities for your very own Maker Party.

Want to join in? Maker Party officially kicks-off today.

Here are activities for your own Maker Party:

Be a #cczero Hero

In addition to all the amazing live events you can host or attend, we wanted to create a way for our global digital community to participate.

We’re planning a global contribute-a-thon to unite Mozillians around the world and grow the number of images in the public domain. We want to showcase what the open internet movement is capable of. And we’re making a statement when we do it: Public domain content helps the open internet thrive.

Check out our #cczero hero event page and instructions on contributing. You should be the owner of the copyright in the work. It can be fun, serious, artistic — whatever you’d like. Get started.

For more information on how to submit your work to the public domain or to Creative Commons, click here.

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Post Crimes

Mozilla has created an app to highlight the outdated nature of some of the EU’s copyright laws, like the absurdity that photos of public landmarks can be unlawful. Try the Post Crimes web app: Take a selfie in front of the Eiffel Tower’s night-time light display, or the Little Mermaid in Denmark.

Then, send your selfie as a postcard to your Member of the European Parliament (MEP). Show European policymakers how outdated copyright laws are, and encourage them to forge reform. Get started.

Meme School

It’s absurd, but it’s true: Making memes may be technically illegal in some parts of the EU. Why? Exceptions for parody or quotation are not uniformly required by the present Copyright Directive.

Help Mozilla stand up for creativity, wit, and whimsy through memes! In this Maker Party activity, you and your friends will learn and discuss how complicated copyright law can be. Get started.

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We can’t wait to see what you create this Maker Party. When you participate, you’re standing up for copyright reform. You’re also standing up for innovation, creativity, and opportunity online.

One Mozilla Clubs

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In 2015, The Mozilla Foundation launched the Mozilla Clubs program to bring people together locally to teach, protect and build the open web in an engaging and collaborative way. Within a year it grew to include 240+ Clubs in 100+ cities globally, and now is growing to reach new communities around the world.

Today we are excited to share a new focus for Mozilla Clubs taking place on a University or College Campus (Campus Clubs). Mozilla Campus Clubs blend the passion and student focus of the former Firefox Student Ambassador program and Take Back The Web Campaign with the existing structure of  Mozilla Clubs to create a unified model for participation on campuses!

Mozilla Campus Clubs take advantage of the unique learning environments of Universities and Colleges to bring groups of students together to teach, build and protect the open web. It builds upon the Mozilla Club framework to provide targeted support to those on campus through its:

  1. Structure:  Campus Clubs include an Executive Team in addition to the Club Captain position, who help develop programs and run activities specific to the 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect).
  2. Training & Support: Like all Mozilla Clubs, Regional Coordinators and Club Captains receive training and mentorship throughout their clubs journey. However the nature of the training and support for Campus Clubs is specific to helping students navigate the challenges of setting up and running a club in the campus context.
  3. Activities: Campus Club activities are structured around 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect). Club Captains in a University or College can find suggested activities (some specific to students) on the website here.

These clubs will be connected to the larger Mozilla Club network to share resources, curriculum, mentorship and support with others around the world. In 2017 you’ll see additional unification in terms of a joint application process for all Regional Coordinators and a unified web presence.

This is an exciting time for us to unite our network of passionate contributors and create new opportunities for collaboration, learning, and growth within our Mozillian communities. We also see the potential of this unification to allow for greater impact across Mozilla’s global programs, projects and initiatives.

If you’re currently involved in Mozilla Clubs and/or the FSA program, here are some important things to know:

  • The Firefox Student Ambassador Program is now Mozilla Campus Clubs: After many months of hard work and careful planning the Firefox Ambassador Program (FSA) has officially transitioned to Mozilla Clubs as of Monday September 19th, 2016. For full details about the Firefox Student Ambassador transition check out this guide here.
  • Firefox Club Captains will now be Mozilla Club Captains: Firefox Club Captains who already have a club, a structure, and a community set up on a university/college should register your club here to be partnered with a Regional Coordinator and have access to new resources and opportunities, more details are here.
  • Current Mozilla Clubs will stay the same: Any Mozilla Club that already exists will stay the same. If they happen to be on a university or college campus Clubs may choose to register as a Campus Club, but are not required to do so.
  • There is a new application for Regional Coordinators (RC’s): Anyone interested in taking on more responsibility within the Clubs program can apply here.  Regional Coordinators mentor Club Captains that are geographically close to them. Regional Coordinators support all Club Captains in their region whether they are on campus or elsewhere.
  • University or College students who want to start a Club at their University and College may apply here. Students who primarily want to lead a club on a campus for/with other university/college students will apply to start a Campus Club.
  • People who want to start a club for any type of learner apply here. Anyone who wants to start a club that is open to all kinds of learners (not limited to specifically University students) may apply to start a Club here.

Individuals who are leading Mozilla Clubs commit to running regular (at least monthly) gatherings, participate in community calls, and contribute resources and learning materials to the community. They are part of a network of leaders and doers who support and challenge each other. By increasing knowledge and skills in local communities Club leaders ensure that the internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all.

This is the beginning of a long term collaboration for the Mozilla Clubs Program. We are excited to continue to build momentum for Mozilla’s mission through new structures and supports that will help engage more people with a passion for the open web.

Firefox 49 new contributors

With the release of Firefox 49, we are pleased to welcome the 48 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 39 of whom were brand new volunteers! Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic individuals, and take a look at their contributions:

Firefox 48 new contributors

With the release of Firefox 48, we are pleased to welcome the 78 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 57 of whom were brand new volunteers! Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic individuals, and take a look at their contributions:

Firefox 47 new contributors

With the release of Firefox 47, we are pleased to welcome the 41 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 33 of whom were brand new volunteers! Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic individuals, and take a look at their contributions:

  • malayaleecoder: 1219323, 1234875, 1238537, 1241846, 1241941, 1243821, 1247723
  • matthewstroud101: 1247450
  • ruxton: 1033144
  • u562192: 1249281
  • varunnaganathan912: 1236387, 1238796
  • Andrew: 1249937
  • Andrew Swan: 612168, 1156826, 1228247, 1236940, 1245597, 1245600, 1245603, 1245678, 1250880, 1251766, 1256399
  • Angel Bouzo: 1194033
  • Astley Chen: 1228918
  • Bob: 730192
  • Calixte Denizet: 1248981
  • Daniel Maher: 1248898
  • Daniel Näslund: 1239710, 1242196, 1250589
  • Deepthi Venkitaramanan: 1244328
  • Eric Hu: 920169, 1244766, 1245910
  • Frank-Rainer Grahl: 1246614
  • Greg Tatum: 1164252, 1242958, 1252971
  • Huma Zafar: 1206166
  • James Burke: 1139849
  • Jeffrey Tran: 555087, 637238, 938699, 1108019, 1230683, 1230685
  • Joe Whitfield-Seed: 1245496
  • Jonathan Howard: 1241931
  • KM Lee: 1248907
  • Leo Ufimtsev: 1229206
  • Maurya Talisetti: 1156176, 1242352
  • Michelangelo De Simone: 1247445, 1249833
  • Nils M.: 1225102
  • Oussama Ben Guirat: 1224192, 1251960
  • Priyen Patel: 1245722
  • Ricky Rosario: 1249642
  • Rok Garbas: 1248983
  • Ryo Motozawa: 1226047, 1244586, 1211783, 1244641
  • Sambuddha Basu: 952564
  • Sanyam Khurana: 1221494
  • Sourabh Shrivastava: 1241991
  • Stefan Dye: 1204520
  • Sándor Gecsey: 241698
  • Tristan: 1244197
  • Tushar Saini: 1228170
  • Vince Tieu: 524757
  • dlim: 1231549
  • radu stoica: 1248558, 1250499
  • A New Firefox Development Forum

    We’ve been looking for the right home for Firefox browser development Q&A for a while now. It’s taken longer than it should have, but after a lot of discussion and experimentation with different tools and forums, we’ve finally come to a conclusion.

    In retrospect the decision was obvious; hindsight is like that. But here it is; if we want everyone in the community to be a part of making Firefox great, then we should be where the community is: part of the Mozilla Community Discourse forum.

    Things are a bit thin on the ground there now; I’ll be migrating over some questions and answers from other forums to stock that pond shortly. In the meantime if you’re new to Discourse it’s a very civilized piece of forum software. You can keep track of discussions happening there by logging in and taking a look in the upper right-hand corner, where you’ll see “Watching”, “Tracking”, “Normal” and “Muted”. Set that to “Watching”, and you’ll get a notification when a new topic comes up for discussion. Set it to “Tracking”, and you’ll also get a note when you’re called out by name. You can also watch or track individual threads, which is a nice touch.

    Alternatively, if you’re a fan of syndicated feeds you can grab an Atom feed as follows:

    https://discourse.mozilla-community.org/c/firefox-development.rss

    I hope you’ll join us in helping build Firefox into everything it can be, the best browser in the world and the cornerstone of a free, open and participatory Web. And as always, if you’ve got questions about that, please email me directly.

    Thank you,

    – mhoye

    Jakarta Community Space Launch

    This post was written by Fauzan Alfi.

    It was not an ordinary Friday 13th for Mozilla Indonesia because on May 13th, 2016, it was a very big day for us. After months of planning and preparation, the Mozilla Community Space Jakarta finally launched and opened for the community. It’s the 4th volunteer-run physical community space after Bangalore (now closed), Manila and Taipei and another one is opening soon in Berlin. Strategically located in Cikini – Central Jakarta, the Space will become a place for Mozillians from Greater Jakarta and Bandung to do many activities, especially developer-focused events, and to build relationships with other tech communities in the city.

    The Space

    The Space. Photo by Yofie Setiawan

    Invited to the event were many open source and other communities around the city. Mozilla Reps, FSAs and Mozillians also joined to celebrate the Space opening. On his presentation, Yofie Setiawan (Mozilla Rep, Jakarta Space Manager) hopes that Jakarta Community Space can be useful for many people and communities, especially to educate anyone who comes and joins events that take place in the space.

    Opening Event

    Dian Ina and Rara talk to guests. Photo by Yofie Setiawan

    Ceremonial first piece

    Brian gets the ceremonial first bite. Photo by Yofie Setiawan

    Also joining the event, Brian King from Participation Team at Mozilla. During his remarks, Brian said that the reason behind the Jakarta Community Space is because “the Mozilla community here is one of the most active globally, with deep roots and a strong network in tech scene”. He also added that “Indonesia is an important country with a very dynamic Web presence, and we’d like to engage with more people to make the online experience better for everyone.”

    The Jakarta Community Space is around 40 square meters in area that fits 20-30 people inside. On the front side, it has glass wall that’s covered by frosted sticker with some Mozilla projects wording printed on it. Inside, we have some chairs, tables, home theater set, food & drink supplies and coffee machine. Most of the items were donated by Mozillians in Jakarta.

    The tour

    The tour. Photo by Yofie Setiawan

    One area where the Jakarta Community excelled was with the planning and design. All the processes are done by the community itself. One of Reps from Indonesia, Fauzan Alfi – who has a background in architecture, helped design the space and kept the process transparent on the Community Design GitHub. The purpose is to ignite collaborative design, not only from Indonesian community but also from other parts of the globe. More creativity was shown by creating mural drawings of landmarks in selected cities around the world – including Monas of Jakarta.

    Jakarta Community Space means a lot for Mozilla community in Greater Jakarta and Indonesia, in general. Having a physical place means the Indonesian community will have their own home to spread the mission and collaborate with more communities that are aligned with Mozilla, especially developer communities. Hopefully, the Space will bring more and more people to contribute to Mozilla and help shape the future of the Web.