10 days of Mozillians: meet Flore!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Flore Allemandou

“I was amazed by this bunch of people, brought together by passion, trying to fight giants and managing to do it”

 

Hi Flore! First of all, would you mind shortly introduce yourself and give us three keywords that would define you the best?

My name is Flore, I’m 37, from Lyon in France, and I’m a scientist. Three words that define me would be curious, woman, happy.

And how did you discover the Web?

I discovered the Web in 1996 in a public library in my home city while trying to do some research for a college work.

Internet creates bonds between humans and helps overcome barriers. It must remain that way, keep it open and free.

Tell us a bit more about you and Mozilla; if you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

It brings people together, and it is enriched by their diversity.

How and why did you start contributing to Mozilla?

I started contributing to Mozilla in 2004, when Mozilla Europe was founded. I never ceased since then. I was amazed by this bunch of people, brought together by passion, trying to fight giants and managing to do it. I wanted to be part of it.

And what’s the contribution you’re the most proud of?

I had a surge of pride when I did a presentation on Womoz in the Mozilla Devroom at the FOSDEM 2013. It was a sort of achievement. Being from a non-technical background, I never thought I could do that, but I did.

Please tell us more about your community. Is there anything you find particularly interesting or special about it?

My community is usually referred to as the “French community”. But really, it’s the French-speaking community. You speak French, you’re welcome. You don’t live in France? No problem…

What’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

Best memories are usually in the evening after an event, pizzas are on the table and people start sharing a laugh, telling stories, passing on traditions… We ensure everyone feels welcomed and a part of the community.

Now let’s talk about the future, what exciting things do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

I wish that Mozilla will continue to surprise everyone in the future. Who would have thought ten (or even five) years ago that we would be launching an OS for mobile phones?

There is so much work ahead of us. As long as the way remains open. I just hope to be part of it for many years to come.

Thank you Flore!

10 days of Mozillians: meet Wim!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Wim Benes

“The use of software shouldn’t be limited in any way, not by device, OS nor plugins.”

Wim Benes

Hi Wim! First, please shortly introduce yourself and give us three keywords that define you!

My name is Wim Benes, I’m 48 and I live in The Netherlands in a province called Friesland, where we speak the Frysk – Frisian – language. That’s the locale I am responsible for in Mozilla Localization. In my daytime I am a system administrator at a hospital. My keywords are sports, nature and Open-Source!

Now what about you and the Web; how and when did you discover it?

It feels like I’ve been online for ages. It all started with a beeping modem over 56k. I guess it was circa 1995, right after Windows 95 came out.

I started exploring the web and quickly switched to Netscape as my default browser. All was new, so I had to search for email, newsgroups, bulletin boards and search providers. At that time the Internet wasn’t required for my work as a draftsman in an architectural agency, so all I did was just out of curiosity for the Web.

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

I really like Mozilla’s new slogan: “the Web is the platform”.

Why? What does it mean for you?

The use of software shouldn’t be limited in any way, not by device, OS or plugins. It’s ok to deliver paid services, for instance for workflows or presentations, as long as it’s relying on pure web applications such as CSS and JavaScript.

Tell us about you & Mozilla: if you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

The real Open Community.

And what’s the contribution you’re the most proud of?

The first official Frisian Firefox in July 2006. I first started investigating the possibility of localizing Firefox in October 2004. Localization wasn’t organized as well as it is nowadays and I started with the Dutch version first. After a long time of struggling in order to get the translated files into the repositories, I was very excited when the Frisian version came out with Firefox 1.5.0.2.

Let’s talk about you and your community: what’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

We took a picture to celebrate one billion Firefox downloads, and our picture ended up on http://website-archive.mozilla.org/onebillionplusyou.com/#feature-influence !

What exciting things do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

I would love to see governments acknowledge the benefits of the Open Web and set an example by asking developers to keep that in mind while they create new cool stuff.

That would give a huge boost to make people understand how the Web should work. I want Mozilla to be the big example for all other great Internet companies.

And what do you wish for the Web?

To keep it open and accessible for everyone, everywhere, on any device.

Thank you Wim for your answers and the time you’ve given so far to Mozilla!

10 days of Mozillians: meet Ahmed!

Tristan Nitot

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Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Ahmed Nefzaoui

“We do things together and that keeps us solid.”

Ahmed Nefzaoui

Hi Ahmed! Tell us a bit more about yourself to get started.

I’m Ahmed Nefzaoui, from Tozeur, Tunisia. I study Web Development and it’s my graduation year!

I like developing web stuff using the latest technologies (sometimes the ones that are not even standardized yet) and I learn as much as I can about implementing RTL versions of stuff.

That’s awesome; we wish you the best for your graduation! And how did you discover the Web?

So this goes back to end of 2006, beginning of 2007 when I first bought a computer – without Internet access. I was like 13 years old and dying to explore the Internet. There were a couple of games in that computer but I wasn’t interested in the games themselves: I was trying to find out how to explore the code of their how-to-play guides, which used HTML technology – what we call now “inspect” and “view source”. Then I literally started to decouple the code (tag by tag) and that was when I learned some of the basics.

I didn’t have an Internet subscription as I was a 13-year-old kid, but I was secretly using a Dial-up Internet access and whenever I had the chance to be connected I was downloading PDF books about HTML, CSS and JS. I read them and started practicing.

That pretty much was my very first interaction with the Internet. You could say I was more interested in “how to do it” rather than “what to do with it”!

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

FIGHT for it to stay open & free! That’s because the Internet is open that I have been able to view the code. If it wasn’t free I wouldn’t have had access to those books I downloaded, and I wouldn’t have learned how to “make the internet”.

Now what about you and Mozilla? If you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

Mozilla is my 127.0.0.1, my home, and is all my hopes for a better internet future.

How did you start contributing to Mozilla?

I was fascinated by the fact that an organization as big as Mozilla has everything they work on shared in a wiki that is accessible to everyone. I started crawling through the wiki trying to learn as much as I could.

Then, after about six months, Andreas (Editor’s Note: Andreas Gal is chief technology officer and Vice President of Engineering at Mozilla) announced Boot2Gecko. I LOVED the idea and the fact that someone like me could contribute such project with no one saying “No, you can’t.”

I started learning about Boot2Gecko and with time I wrote articles about it in Arabic. Those articles caught more and more attention, and in January 2012 a friend of mine suggested me to join the local community in Tunisia and gave me their contact. I contacted Melek and Sofien and they were very welcoming!

I learned more about how communities work and in the meantime they read my articles about Boot2Gecko and introduced me to Rami, founder of the Arabic Mozilla.

They all gave me a chance and trusted me on being someone who could help improving our community, Mozilla Tunisia, and Arabic Mozilla communities!

What do you like the most about what you’re doing with Mozilla?

That you get to contribute to things in the making, and you get to be one of the people who make it ready for everyone in the world to use and enjoy.

Unlike many others, Mozilla gives me the chance to REALLY impact the world and specifically the internet.

That’s great actually. And so what’s the contribution you’re the most proud of?

Firefox OS. Firefox OS is aimed at the developing countries, which means Middle East and North Africa too! But that’s not possible without a fully functional Right-To-Left User Interface. I work on developing that interface and it’s such a huge pride for me to do so!

What do you think makes your local Mozilla community unique?

Mozilla Tunisia is an example to follow here! We’re like a family, everyone has ups and downs but what makes us unique is that we do it all as a team. We do things together and that keeps us solid. We manage things as open as possible and as serious as we can in order to accomplish the goals we plan for.

What about the future now, what do you think Mozilla can give you in the years to come?

To me? The opportunity to have more impact and to help others even more by making the Internet a better place for the coming generations.

And which exciting things do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

If one day my refrigerator, TV or Car uses the web as its technology, it will be thanks to Mozilla. Mozilla doesn’t only fight to keep the web open and free, but also limitless.

What do you wish for the Web?

I wish for the web to stay open and free, and to keep developing while remaining accessible so that another 13-year-old kid from the future may hack on it and learn!

Thanks Ahmed!

10 days of Mozillians: meet Melek!

Tristan Nitot

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Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Melek Jebnoun

“Safety, diversity and accessibility to all!”

Melek Jebnoun

Hi Melek!

First of all, would you mind introduce yourself shortly and give us the three keywords that define you the best?

My name is Melek Jebnoun. I’m a 26-year-old Tunisian computer engineer. My keywords are OpenPower, WomenPower and trust. What I like? I would say challenges, sharing, to please people with surprises and small gestures – I know, weird! – shopping and chocolate ice cream!

How and when did you discover the Web?

I would say the Web and I had a “superficial relationship” at first. I discovered the Web because of my studies – I graduated in IT – and I used it to do some researches for my studies.

The Tunisian revolution in 2010 opened up my eyes on the many faces of the Web ! I discovered the power of social networks, of digital media, of blogs… That’s the moment when I started being fascinated by the Web, and I started seeing things differently.

I discovered Mozilla a few months later, which gave me a whole new vision on the Internet… the open Web ! I’ve been surprised to discover how cool the Web may be. In addition to my studies I started writing technical articles about my country in a news website, http://www.webdo.tn, and my relationship with the Web evolved and grew up as it became a dependence and my first resource in my everyday life.

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

Explore it as much as you can! And don’t lose any occasion to benefit from it for your business, daily life…

When you realize that without Internet and its help, the Tunisian revolution wouldn’t have spread and possibly wouldn’t have given good results, you measure how huge the impact of Internet is!

Let’s talk about you and Mozilla furthermore! If you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

Mozilla makes sure of your freedom, feeds your passion and fills you with love with others!

How and why did you start contributing to Mozilla?

I was very involved in a university club about open-source and free softwares. That’s how I started my immersion into the “open” world. I was lucky to meet Rafik – the initiator of Mozilla Tunisia – at an IT event. He asked me to join the Mozilla adventure. It was my first concrete experience of community and non-profit work! It was a shock, you know, that feeling like “God why and where all this was hidden before?” I felt like I had been living in a cave for many years before!

We started the Mozilla Tunisia experience from scratch with the help of two other contributors. Working during late nights on the website, on contents and organizing the Firefox 4 party.

Those are amazing souvenirs! I think that launching this community is the personal and collective accomplishment I’m the most proud of until now!

What do you like the most about what you’re doing with Mozilla?

What I like the most is the expression of people when you tell them it’s free, that the documentation is open and that you may hack it by yourself! Especially the reaction of young people, priceless! I love to meet amazing people and new friends from all around the world, I love this “other face” of Mozilla!

Do you have a Mozilla-related anecdote you’d like to share with us?

The idea to launch Mozilla Tunisia wouldn’t have seen the light of day if the digital newspaper I worked for hadn’t made a mistake and written “the *Mozzarella* Firefox navigator” in one of its articles – the damages of spellchecker!

When Rafik saw it he thought it was time to start a community and make people aware about Firefox.

And what’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

The Mozilla Tunisia tour in 2012! It was one of the best six months I’ve ever had! We visited many universities, met a lot of people, recruited new Mozillians… I think it was one of the major things Mozilla Tunisia did and it strengthened our team a lot.

Some employees and Mozillians from all around the world took part in events within the tour, we had amazing moments with Tunisians students and super funny moments at night!

What do you think makes your local Mozilla community unique?

Members differences!

We are a community with a lot of different personalities and ages… I love this mixture, it makes the exchanges very rich and funny sometimes!

What about the future? What do you expect from Mozilla in the years to come?

Free and accessible resources to use the web the way I want, especially in a secure way.

I love the fact that Mozilla offers Internet users a lot of tools so they may choose what they want! The fight for security and privacy is also such a wonderful cause to me. I really admire Mozilla for fighting for this.

And new experiences in new fields with new people! I think the under 15 year-old world and their web experience may be more explored!

And so what do you wish for Mozilla?

Success, diversity and many many many contributors!

What do you wish for the Web?

Safety, diversity and accessibility to all!

Thank you Melek for your dynamism!

10 days of Mozillians: meet Ibrahima!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Ibrahima Sarr

“Mozilla is a community of people from everywhere.”

 

Hello Ibrahima! To get started would you please introduce yourself in a few words?

My name is Ibrahima Sarr. I live in Le Havre, in Normandy (Northern France) where I teach English as a foreign language. I like the Web, computers and aviation!

Tell us a bit more about you and the Web: how and when did you discover it?

I was among the first in France to have an internet connection back in 1994. A the time we had 14400 Us Robotics modems using our landline, just like when you make voice calls.

Of course there wasn’t much content, not like today. So the first thing I thought about was to build my own website in my language, Fulah (Editor’s note: Fulah is the first or second language spoken by various peoples across West and Central Africa). I had a huge web space of 2MB made available by my new provider CompuServe!

At the time there was no tool to build websites, not even a proper Html editor. CompuServe provided Homepage Wizard in a floppy disk and that’s how I started building web pages.

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

The Internet opened the doors to many languages and cultures, and enabled otherwise isolated people to get together and to collaborate to make the world a better place. This is particularly true for my language and the Fulah people who live in 19 countries across West and Central Africa.

If you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

There is simply no place like Mozilla, as I’m used to say or tweet. You are never alone and you’re always empowered to do what you feel like doing, and feel at home.

How and why did you start contributing to Mozilla?

Because I’ve always volunteered for my language. So it was natural to me to give it back to Mozilla for enabling us to have Firefox in our language.

And what would be the contribution you’re the most proud of?

Localizing Firefox OS in Fulah.

Now let’s talk about you & your community: tell us about something that you find particularly interesting or special about you or your local community!

Since I live in France I am a member of Mozilla’s French-speaking community, but I also help build communities in West Africa. Mozilla is a community of people from everywhere.

What’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

I went to Senegal in March 2014 and trained community members in the use of localization tools. On the first day, by the time I finished explaining the basics, they were almost all translating and no longer listening to me! 15 minutes into the first day of training and they did not need me anymore! Cool and funny at the same time.

What makes your local Mozilla community unique?

I don’t think we are unique, but when it comes to the Fulah community, we are in 19 countries not counting the diaspora. So getting together and doing good for the language is just so great. We are preserving the language while accompanying it into the century.

Now let’s talk about the future, what do you want from Mozilla in the forthcoming years?

We are waiting for Mozilla to officially deploy Firefox OS in Africa, since we have localized it in Fulah.

Then what would be even more exciting would be to see all of those devices using our great OS in homes and everywhere, and in our language! I am thinking of tablets, smart TV, GPS etc.

What do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

I am really excited about educating the youngest of us to master the Web, as it’s bound to become the only platform. Mozilla has not missed the opportunity to look far ahead by initiating the Webmaker project.

My vision about Africa being a key actor of the next Web is to make sure initiatives likes Webmaker, Web Literacy and Open Badges are introduced into the educational system in many countries. I have already talked to many deciders who are enthusiastic about the idea.

Thank you Ibrahima!

MDN MozFest outcomes: self-teaching

Jeremie Patonnier

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A few weeks ago the Mozilla Festival took place in London. Members of the MDN team were there, and we ran several sessions. Chris Mills and I ran two instances of a session about self-teaching.

MozFest by Yuandra Ismiraldi

The intent of those sessions was to share experience about self-teaching (as everybody teaches themselves one way or another) and to get some outcomes to improve the MDN Learning Area, which is intended to be used for self-teaching about the Web.

We ran two 40-minute sessions, one on Saturday and one on Sunday. In order to make sure everybody had a chance to share their experience, we split the session in two parts:

For the first ten minutes of each session, we asked five questions to the participants, and gave them sticky notes to put their answer to the questions on a wall.

  • What works well about self-teaching?
  • What sucks about self-teaching?
  • Do you prefer self-teaching or mentoring and why?
  • What resources are good?
  • What tools would you like to see/use?

The remaining 30 minutes was dedicated to discussing the various answers, making sure every body had a chance to share their experiences and opinions.

So what did we get?

What works well about self-teaching?

The biggest outcome is the feeling of accomplishment of learning things by ourselves. Fighting difficulties and being able to solve problems on our own is a big part of the self-teaching experience.

What sucks about self-teaching?

On the other hand, feeling lonely appears to be the biggest issue with self-teaching. That sounds obvious but very concrete issues were raised:

  • It can be difficult to keep motivation and focus.
  • It’s hard to find answers when we are stuck with a problem and it feels sometimes like “begging” for help.
  • It’s hard to find good self-teaching materials without any help or guidance.

Do you prefer self-teaching or mentoring and why?

According to our participants, both self-teaching and mentoring have their pros and cons:

Self-teaching is nice to be able to learn at our own speed and to choose what to learn. On the other hand, again, being lonely and alone when facing a hard problem can lead to a dead end.

Mentoring definitely makes things easier when we need help or to reach a community of peers, especially to solve complex problems. But on the other hand, it requires to adjust ourselves to peers’ and mentors’ way of teaching/learning which can be difficult to follow because it’s too fast or feeling like moving too slow if we are quick learners.

What resources are good?

Among the various resources that came out of the session, there are three which were pointed out quite often:

  • Online courses and tutorials (with Codecademy gaining mindshare as usual) to learn the basics.
  • Community tools (forums, mailing-lists, IRC, etc.) to share help and knowledge between peers.
  • Books or offline resources as a source of reliable long standing knowledge.

What tools would you like to see/use?

Finally when it come to self-teaching, the most wanted tools are:

  • Interactive learning tools for code (Codecademy and Webmaker are the most often names that show up).
  • Tools to measure/evaluate one’s level of knowledge.
  • Some resources on “learning to learn” on their own, and on structuring their learning pathways.

Those session were very enlightening and will definitely help us in shaping the MDN learning area.

Thanks to all the attendees. I look forward to run some other sessions next year.

10 days of Mozillians: meet Irayani!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Irayani Queencyputri

“And above it all, I teach the Web!”

Irayani Queencyputri

Hi Irayani!

First of all, may you please shortly introduce yourself?

My name is Irayani Queencyputri, but you can call me Rara! I am 34 years old, I live in Jakarta, Indonesia. I work as a dentist in my daily life, I blog since 2002, and I volunteer for Mozilla as a Mozilla Reps member and mentor. I like to travel and meet some new people. Three words: Dentist, Travel, Mozillian!

What about the Web? How did you discover it?

I was introduced to the Internet back in 1997. I just graduated from high school at the time and I was about to enter university. At first, I only knew there was a service called e-mail, thanks to which one would send some mails via the Internet – and not by post. Then my mom received an e-mail from the internet service provider, which I emailed back. Someone answered and she is the one who introduce me to mIRC, browsing, personal web at Geocities, and then I discover a new playground called the Web <3

What about you and Mozilla, if you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

One word: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

Tell us a bit more about how you started contributing to Mozilla…

I knew Mozilla from a browser named Firefox!

I have been using Firefox as the default browser in my computer since version 1.5 and never changed since then. Before Firefox, I actually used Netscape and then Internet Explorer and many years later I learned that actually Mozilla actually was born from Netscape!

Back in 2010 I was a chairwoman at Pesta Blogger, an annual national blogger event in Indonesia. That’s where I met Gen Kanai, as Mozilla was supporting the event. After a long talk with him I realized that Mozilla is not only about the browser. Mozilla is a community that has many projects and an awesome mission!

I also met Mitchell Baker in the process. Mitchell is so inspiring! After the blogger event, I was so driven by the mission and asked Gen how to join Mozilla. I love the Web so much, but I cannot code. So I started helping to organize events for Mozilla.

Then I met Viking Karwur, and soon after that, mid 2011, the Mozilla Reps program was launched, and I have been a Rep until now.

What’s the contribution you’re the most proud of?

I am a Mozilla Rep! In that position, I have the opportunity to create Mozilla events in Indonesia, and to give Mozillians the chance to share their experience with the attendees.

I also teach how to use the Web in a very positive way with Mozilla.

And above it all, I teach the Web!

Let’s talk a bit more about you & your community. What’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

There are so many memories, and all of them are the best! But what I cannot forget that we found a way to
do a Maker Party in the Park.

Let’s open up about the future! What do you expect from Mozilla in the future?

I think Mozilla can spread the spirit of community and openness even more broadly in the future. And keep on influencing other people to learn, to teach, to share everything about the Web, in a positive way!

And what do you wish for the Web?

I wish the Web to be more open, to give us a place to be as creative as we are, to dig some positive potential in each of us, and to give us a space in which we may always teach, learn, and share!

Thank you Irayani!

Thank you! Peace, Love and Smile :)

10 days of Mozillians: meet Shreyas!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Shreyas N. Kutty

“The Internet is the world’s largest public resource. It’s our duty to protect it! “

Shreyas N Kutty

Hello Shreyas! Could you please introduce yourself in a few words?

My name is Shreyas. I’m a student pursuing my Bachelor in Computer Science Engineering. I’m an Open Web enthusiast, a Mozilla Representative and a Community builder from India.

Tell us a bit more about you and the Web: how and when did you discover the Web?

I discovered the Web when I was in school. I used to get projects from school and my sister used to search for images in Google and print it out for me. I always fancied the concept of getting whatever you wanted at the tip of your fingers. It was when I started growing up that I discovered the endless possibilities of the Web.

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

The Internet is the world’s largest public resource. The possibilities are only limited to your thoughts. It’s our duty to protect it! Play your little part and protect the Web!

If you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

Mozilla, as defined by any Mozillian, would be a Community of like-minded people who strive to protect and preserve the Open Web ensuring transparency and accessibility to all.

What do you like the most about what you’re doing with Mozilla?

Whenever I see people using Mozilla Firefox, I feel proud thinking that I’ve helped shape a community of people who contribute to build the browser.

And what’s the contribution you’re the most proud of?

Growing communities and getting new contributors to join a global movement to protect and empower the Open Web is the contribution I’m the most proud of.

Evangelizing, inspiring people to contribute and get involved, and convincing them that “one does not need to be a coder to contribute to Mozilla!”

Absolutely! Let’s talk about your community. Is there anything you find particularly interesting or special about you and/or your local community?

The Indian community is one of the most active communities in the world, with active student participation. This is something I am particularly proud of when I attend events where I represent Mozilla.

The best thing after contributing to Mozilla is that now, wherever I travel in India I have friends that I’ve met through Mozilla and the Firefox Student Ambassador program!

And what’s your best memory with your fellow community members?

Each and every event, from a MozCafe to a Hackathon, is really unique. People with various skills with the common passion for the Open Web get together and make things and inspire more people to be a part. The ever growing community is the strength of each event.

What exciting things do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

The launch of the Firefox OS phone in India has paved the way for new possibilities and limitless opportunities in shaping the future of an Open Web, by making it more accessible for the common people. I believe Firefox OS could have a revolutionary impact on the entire world and not just the Indian community.

What do you wish for the Web?

I wish to see a future Web which is secure, transparent, open and easily accessible for everyone, irrespective of who they are, and to protect and to preserve the world’s largest and ever growing public resource – the Internet.

Thank you Shreyas, I could not agree more!

Grow Mozilla discussion this Thursday

dboswell

If you’re interested in helping new people get involved with Mozilla, join us Thursday for an open community building forum.

10 days of Mozillians: meet Ben!

Tristan Nitot

Firefox is turning 10! In order to celebrate, meet 10 Mozillians from all over the world.
They share with us how they feel about Mozilla and the Web : their memories, their daily life as a Mozillian, their expectations for the next 10 years and more.

Benjamin Kerensa

“Mozilla means open because it is moving the Open Web forward and ensuring it is protected and open for all to access and build.”

Ben Kerensa

Hi Benjamin!

First of all would you please introduce yourself in a few words, and give us three keywords that define you?

My name is Benjamin Kerensa and I’m 30. I live in Portland, Oregon and am an IT Consultant. I’m passionate about building communities around open-source projects and moving the Open Web forward. In my spare time, I enjoy hobbies such as photography and soap making. Keywords: Open, Innovation, Community.

How and when did you discover the Web?

I discovered the web in the 1990’s in school where I got an opportunity to use Mosaic, a predecessor to Netscape Navigator, which was my primary browser for a number of years. I would surf the web and use early search engines to find information and learn.

If you had one thing to say to the world about the Internet and its potential, what would it be?

I would say that the possibilities of the Internet are beyond anything we can imagine. The Internet continues to evolve far beyond what anyone had ever imagined and it is important that we protect this resource so its available to everyone.

If you had one word or sentence to describe Mozilla, what would it be?

For me, Mozilla means open because it is moving the Open Web forward and ensuring it is protected and open for all to access and build.

What do you like the most about contributing to Mozilla?

I like the feeling of knowing the work I do will impact millions of people around the world in a positive way. I enjoy knowing that everyone from schoolchildren to world leaders use software that I help build and that software helps them do what they are passionate about.

What would be your best memory with your fellow community members?

My most fond memory is gathering with Mozillians for Summit and being able to be equally excited about how were all working on something so much bigger than ourselves.

What exciting things do you envision for Mozilla in the future?

I truly believe Mozilla’s future is bright and that millions of people around the world will look to Mozilla to be a good steward of the Open Web and help push the open web forward through amazing open-source software and new platforms and tools.

Thanks Ben!