Yammer Inclusion Research

dianderson

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Dino on behalf of Tre Kirkman

My name is Tre Kirkman, a summer intern with the Legal and Policy teams. I am currently a student at Stanford University studying Public Policy, African-American Studies, and Computer Science. I am especially interested in the ways that organizations create (or fail to create) inclusive spaces for employees to thrive.

 

When I first arrived at Mozilla I met with Dino to find out how I may contribute to the Diversity & Inclusion Strategy. After taking some time to refine my ideas with both Dino and Mardi, I came across the Roadblocks to Productivity survey, which highlighted the need for Mozilla to refine and improve its modes of communication.

 

To that end, I will be helping with a Diversity and Inclusion Initiative and Removing Roadblocks to Productivity by conducting research into staff use of Yammer — How do we use it? What draws in regular users or pushes away inactive users? Is it an inclusive space? My project will try to gather useful community feedback and social listening data to accurately assess Yammer’s role within Mozilla. Ultimately, I hope this research will be a useful resource for both initiatives as they work to continue making Mozilla an amazing place to work.

Next week I will put up an etherpad with a few short questions for community feedback. In the meantime please email me at tkirkman at mozilla dot com if you have questions, concerns, or ideas to share.

E-Mail Subject Line Etiquette: helping decrease communication stressors

dianderson

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Dino posts on behalf of Payam Keshtbod

Hi everyone!

My name is Payam Keshtbod, a Mozilla Volunteer Contributor on the People Team. I am currently a student at Indiana University with an interest in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, particularly on how “mental stressors” affect employee productivity and overall well-being. Stressors are things that cause mental tension for individuals.

I will be contributing to a Diversity and Inclusion Initiative and helping on the Removing Roadblocks to Productivity,  regarding ineffective communication. My project will look at how we can put in place some good practices to decrease stressors and ineffective communication in e-mail subject lines.

If interested please go on to this etherpad to contribute your ideas. I would love to hear your ideas on how you can make subject lines in emails more clear, effective, and efficient for the writers and readers.

Please email me, payam.keshtbod(at)gmail(dot)com) to comments, questions, or feedback! I will update weekly as community feedback comes in.

Grow Mozilla discussion this Thursday

dboswell

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If you’re interested in helping new people get involved with Mozilla, join us Thursday for an open community building forum.

APPLICATION EXTENDED! LAST CALL! Apply to attend Grow Tunisia by MONDAY!

enoonan

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We are aware that the application to Grow Tunisia (formerly MozCamp) closed early by mistake so we are extending the application through MONDAY, AUGUST 4! Please apply now if you haven’t already!

This is the final reminder that applications to attend the regional event for dedicated community builders in Europe, the Middle East and Africia, Grow Tunisia (formerly MozCamp), are now due by Monday, August 4 with the extended deadline.

Grow Tunisia will take place in Tunis from Friday, September 26, through Sunday, September 28. Participants must be available to arrive on Thursday, September 25, and should plan to depart on Monday, September 29.

If you’re unsure if you meet the application requirements, please apply! We have a panel of Reps and other community members who will be reviewing each application, so they can determine if applicants fit the requirements so you don’t have to.

To find out more about the Grow program and the Grow Tunisia event, please check out the wiki.

If you have any questions, please take a look at the FAQ first and if your question isn’t there, ping me on IRC in #Grow2014 (lmn) or reply to me via email.

New Get Involved Page Prototypes and Community Involvement So Far

Sean Bolton

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Mozilla is not just one voice and the way we build our products, especially the Get Involved page, needs to reflect that.

We have involved the community on this project so far in many ways including meetings, blogs, etherpads, surveys, mail lists, card sorting, MozCamps and more. We will continue to do so.

As much as we at Mozilla like to dream of a world where community is a default, it takes some intentional planning to make it that way. The mysterious magic of community is actually less mysterious than it may seem. With the Get Involved page project, we have seen the value of planning ahead and creating intentional structure for community involvement. In doing this we allow both community members to feel useful and make sure that their involvement creates a more successful final product – there is an unarguable value in having community involved.

Continuing with this momentum, today there are 3 early prototypes available which have been created from a history of working with the community on this project. Each one has a distinct approach different from the others, for testing purposes.

You have the opportunity to share your input on these early prototypes and we have provided an easy structure for you to share that with us so we can be sure to incorporate it in the evaluation of a final design – we don’t want your valuable feedback getting lost in overflowing email inboxes. Please use the following Survey Gizmo link to provide your feedback by August 7th (links to prototypes are in the survey): http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1747304/Feedback-Get-Involved-Prototypes When doing so, remember to approach this page from the perspective of a potential contributor. We are specifically checking for how easy, clear and compelling it is to get involved. Please check the wiki page for future updates. We thank you for your participation here – it makes a difference for future contributors.

[REMINDER] Apply to attend Grow Tunisia by THIS FRIDAY!

enoonan

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Hi everyone!

This is a reminder that applications to attend the regional event for dedicated community builders in Europe, the Middle East and Africia, Grow Tunisia, is due by THIS FRIDAY, AUGUST 1.

Grow Tunisia will take place in Tunis from Friday, September 26, through Sunday, September 28. Participants must be available to arrive on Thursday, September 25, and should plan to depart on Monday, September 29.

If you’re unsure if you meet the application requirements, please apply! We have a panel of Reps and other community members who will be reviewing each application, so they can determine if applicants fit the requirements so you don’t have to.

To find out more about the Grow program and the Grow Tunisia event, please check out the wiki.

If you have any questions, please take a look at the FAQ first and if your question isn’t there, ping me on IRC in #Grow2014 (lmn) or reply to me via email.

[Announcement]: Apply to Attend Grow Tunisia (25–28 Sept.)

enoonan

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Hi Mozillians!

We’re excited to announce the first event in the Grow Program (formerly known as MozCamp), for Mozillians who want to deeply develop their leadership and community building skills. The program and events focus on developing contribution skills for yourself and to share with others so we can continue to increase the impact of our communities for the project and in the world.

About Grow Tunisia

The first three-day event, Grow Tunisia, will take place in Tunis from Friday, September 26, through Sunday, September 28. Participants must be available to arrive on Thursday, September 25, and should plan to depart on Monday, September 29.

In order to attend Grow Tunisia, you must be a Mozillian who resides in Africa, Europe or the Middle East, extending east to Iran and Turkey, including Israel and Russia. If you do not live in any of these regions, don’t worry! There will be an upcoming Grow event in your region later this year — please plan to apply for your regional Grow event.

Grow Tunisia participants can expect three full days of intense, instructor-led training as well as challenging hands-on work. The curriculum will include community building skills such as event planning, recruitment and project planning. Additionally, participants will delve into specific contribution areas to sharpen those skills and think about how to invite others to join.

Once participants leave Grow Tunisia, they will work with a mentor and a team of fellow participants to grow our community of active contributors by recruiting at least 5 new active contributors,* reactivating 10 idle contributors or hosting at least 2 events. (*An “active” contributor is one who has completed one measurable contribution for their contribution area.)

Invitation Criteria

Our goal is to gather a group of Mozillians that represents a wide spectrum of our key contribution areas. After discussions with the attendees of a Program Design Session, we came up with the following invitation criteria. By applying to attend Grow Tunisia, you:

  • Commitment
    • Agree to grow the quantity and quality of our communities by recruiting 5 new active Mozillians, reactivating 10 inactive Mozillians or hosting 2 training events (on- and/or offline) before the end of the year
    • Will engage in knowledge sharing (documentation, blogging, social media, etc.)
    • Agree to participate in the entire program, including the event, the development and implementation of a project plan after the event, and follow-ups such as completing surveys, checking in regularly with their project mentors and sharing their progress
  • Leadership
    • Know the regional community well and act as a leader, communicating organizational goals, getting the community active and excited and recruiting and mentoring new contributors
    • Have experience with community building/mentoring
  • Expertise
    • Have expertise in a specific contribution area or areas, with strong interest and experience onboarding, teaching and/or mentoring new active contributors
    • Are an active contributor with a key role in a pathway, one who can benefit from learning how to mentor and bring in new contributors
  • Other
    • Must be over 18 years old to participate in events that involve international travel
    • Proficient in the primary language (in this case English)
    • Resident of Europe, Africa or the Middle East

If you feel you meet the above criteria, we invite you to apply to attend Grow Tunisia: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1742536/Grow-Tunisia-Application

*PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY FRIDAY, AUGUST 1. SORRY, NO EXCEPTIONS.*

If your application is approved, you will receive an official invitation to Grow Tunisia by Monday, August 11, 2014.

If you have any questions or need additional information about applying to participate in this new program, please don’t hesitate to contact us on IRC in #Grow2014, Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM, Pacific Time.

Why Do People Join and Stay Part Of a Community (and How to Support Them)

Sean Bolton

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[This post is inspired by notes from a talk by Douglas Atkin (currently at AirBnB) about his work with cults, brands and community.]

We all go through life feeling like we are different. When you find people that are different the same way you are, that’s when you decide to join.

As humans, we each have a unique self narrative: “we tell ourselves a story about who we are, what others are like, how the world works, and therefore how one does (or does not) belong in order to maximize self.” We join a community to become more of ourselves – to exist in a place where we feel we don’t have to self-edit as much to fit in.

A community must have a clear ideology – a set of beliefs about what it stands for – a vision of the world as it should be rather than how it is, that aligns with what we believe. Communities form around certain ways of thinking first, not around products. At Mozilla, this is often called “the web we want” or ‘the web as it should be.’

When joining a community people ask two questions: 1) Are they like me? and 2) Will they like me? The answer to these two fundamental human questions determine whether a person will become and stay part of a community. In designing a community it is important to support potential members in answering these questions – be clear about what you stand for and make people feel welcome. The welcoming portion requires extra work in the beginning to ensure that a new member forms relationships with people in the community. These relationships keep people part of a community. For example, I don’t go to a book club purely for the book, I go for my friends Jake and Michelle. Initially, the idea of a book club attracted me but as I became friends with Jake and Michelle, that friendship continually motivated me to show up. This is important because as the daily challenges of life show up, social bonds become our places of belonging where we can recharge.

Source: Douglas Atkin, The Glue Projecy

Source: Douglas Atkin, The Glue Project

These social ties must be mixed with doing significant stuff together. In designing how community members participate, a very helpful tool is the community commitment curve. This curve describes how a new member can invest in low barrier, easy tasks that build commitment momentum so the member can perform more challenging tasks and take on more responsibility. For example, you would not ask a new member to spend 12 hours setting up a development environment just to make their first contribution. This ask is too much for a new person because they are still trying to figure out ‘are the like me?’ and ‘will they like me?’ In addition, their sense of contribution momentum has not been built – 12 hours is a lot when your previous task is 0 but 12 is not so much when your previous was 10.

The community commitment curve is a powerful tool for community builders because it forces you to design the small steps new members can take to get involved and shows structure to how members take on more complex tasks/roles – it takes some of the mystery out! As new members invest small amounts of time, their commitment grows, which encourages them to invest larger amounts of time, continually growing both time and commitment, creating a fulfilling experience for the community and the member. I made a template for you to hack your own community commitment curve.

Social ties combined with a well designed commitment curve, for a clearly defined purpose, is powerful combination in supporting a community.

[Post originally appeared on Sean Bolton's blog.]

Grow Mozilla discussion this Thursday

dboswell

0

If you’re interested in helping new people get involved with Mozilla, join us Thursday for an open community building forum.

Firefox 31 New Contributors

josh

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With the upcoming release of Firefox 31, we are pleased to welcome the 62 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 49 of whom were brand new volunteers! Special thanks to Sezen Günes for compiling these statistics for this release. Please join us in thanking each of these diligent and enthusiastic individuals, and take a look at their contributions: